Brunel History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The name Brunel sprang from the history of Medieval France and a region known as Languedoc. It comes from when the family lived in Languedoc.

Early Origins of the Brunel family

The surname Brunel was first found in Languedoc, where the family has formerly been seated from very early times.

Important Dates for the Brunel family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Brunel research. Another 371 words (26 lines of text) covering the years 1191, 1500, and 1789 are included under the topic Early Brunel History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Brunel Spelling Variations

French surnames were subject to numerous alterations in spelling because of the various cultural groups that inhabited specific regions. Eventually, each region possessed its own local dialect of the French language. The early development of the French language, however, was also influenced by other languages. For example, Old French was infused with Germanic words and sounds when barbarian tribes invaded and settled in France after the fall of the Roman Empire. Middle French also borrowed heavily from the Italian language during the Renaissance. As a result of these linguistic and cultural influences, the name Brunel is distinguished by a number of regional variations. The many spelling variations of the name include Brunet, Bruner, Bruney, Brunay, Bruné, Brunais, Brunai, Brunnet, Brunner, Brunney, Brunnay, Brunné, Brunnais, Brunnai, Brune, de Brunet, de Bruner, de Bruney, de Brunay and many more.

Early Notables of the Brunel family (pre 1700)

Another 38 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Brunel Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Brunel migration to the United States

France finally gave land incentives for 2,000 migrants during the 1700s. Early marriage was encouraged in New France, and youths of 18 took fourteen-year-old girls for their wives. The fur trade was developed and attracted migrants, both noble and commoner from France. 15,000 explorers left Montreal in the late 17th and 18th centuries, leaving French names scattered across the continent. The search for the Northwest passage continued. Migration from France to New France or Quebec, as it was now more popularly called, continued until 1759. By 1675, there were 7000 French in Quebec. By the same year the Acadian presence in Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island had reached 500. In the treaty of Utrecht, the Acadians were ceded by France to Britain in 1713. In 1755, 10,000 French Acadians refused to take an oath of allegiance to England and were deported. They found refuge in Louisiana. Meanwhile, in Quebec, the French race flourished, founding in Lower Canada, one of the two great solitudes which became Canada. Many of this distinguished family name Brunel were prominent in social, cultural, religious and political affairs in France and New France. Amongst the settlers in North America with this distinguished name Brunel were

Brunel Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Jean Brunel, who landed in Louisiana in 1719 [1]
  • Marc Isembiere Brunel, who arrived in New York in 1796 [1]
Brunel Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Brunel, who arrived in Mobile, Ala in 1821 [1]

Brunel migration to Canada

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Brunel Settlers in Canada in the 17th Century
  • Marie Catherine Collin Brunel, who landed in Canada in 1665
  • Jacques Brunel, son of Jean and Anne, married Suzanne Bertault, daughter of Jacques and Gillette, in Boucherville, Quebec on 24th November 1677 [2]
  • Jean Brunel, son of Jean and Jeanne, married Marie-Madeleine Richaume, daughter of Pierre and Marthe, in Boucherville, Quebec on 1st April 1677 [2]
Brunel Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century
  • Jacques Brunel, son of Jacques and Suzanne, married Anne Bernard, daughter of Jean and Marie, in Varennes, Quebec on 31st March 1704 [2]
  • Joseph Brunel, son of Hilaire and Marie-Antoinette, married Marie-Josephte Dubois, daughter of Jean and Jeanne, in Champlain, Quebec on 25th November 1718 [2]
  • Jean Brunel, son of Jean and Marie-Madeleine, married Louise Maugue, daughter of Claude and Louise, in Montreal, Quebec on 23rd January 1719 [2]
  • Augustin Brunel, son of Jean and Marie-Madeleine, married Élisabeth Jetté, daughter of Louis-Charles and Élisabeth, in Saint-Ours, Quebec on 28th July 1721 [2]
  • Jacques Brunel, son of Jean and Marie-Madeleine, married Catherine Bourgaud, daughter of Gilles and Marie-Marthe, in Quebec on 14th April 1722 [2]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name Brunel (post 1700)

  • Shirley Brunel, American Republican politician, Candidate in primary for New Hampshire State House of Representatives from Concord 7th Ward, 1938; Elected New Hampshire State Senate 9th District 1948 [3]
  • Alene W. Brunel, American Republican politician, Candidate in primary for New Hampshire State House of Representatives from Concord 7th Ward, 1938 [3]
  • Jacques Brunel (d. 1564), French organist and composer
  • Sir Marc Isambard Brunel (1769-1849), French engineer
  • Sir Marc Isambard Brunel (1769-1849), French-born, English engineer and father of Isambard Kingdom Brunel [4]
  • Isambard Kingdom Brunel (1806-1859), British civil engineer, noted for his bridges and dockyards, best known for construction of the first major British railway, the Great Western Railway [4]

Citations

  1. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  2. ^ Internoscia, Arthur E., and Claire Chevrier. Dictionnaire National des Canadiens Français 1608-1760. Vol. 1, Institut Drouin, 1958.
  3. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, December 1) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  4. ^ Wikisource contributors. "Dictionary of National Biography, 1885-1900." Wikisource . Wikisource , 4 Jun. 2018. Web. 5 Feb. 2019
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