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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2016


Weld Early Origins



The surname Weld was first found in Cheshire in the lands and manor of Eaton in that county. They were descended from Edric, surnamed Stratton or Sylvaticus, created Duke of Mercia by Ethelred, King of England in 1003, but put to death 14 years later by King Canute. Edric Wild or Weld, his descendant in 1066, was a person of great power in the north west of England. He was succeeded by another Edric, William, John, William and Edward, living 1290. William Weld, Sheriff of London in 1352 married Anne Wettenhall and was seated at Eaton in Cheshire. [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Shirley, Evelyn Philip, The Noble and Gentle Men of England; The Arms and Descents. Westminster: John Bower Nichols and Sons, 1866, Print.

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Weld Spelling Variations


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Weld Spelling Variations



Spelling variations of this family name include: Weld, Welde, Weilde, Weldee and others.

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Weld Early History


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Weld Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Weld research. Another 233 words (17 lines of text) covering the years 1599, 1602, 1610, 1609 and 1641 are included under the topic Early Weld History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Weld Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Weld Early Notables (pre 1700)



Another 30 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Weld Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Weld Settlers in United States in the 17th Century

  • Daniel, Edmund, John, Joseph, Samual, Thomas, and Margeret Weld all settled in Salem, Massachusetts in 1632
  • Captain Joseph Weld (1599-1646), who arrived in Roxbury, Massachusetts in 1632, progenitor of the famous Welds of Boston
  • Thomas Weld, who landed in Boston, Massachusetts in 1632
  • John Weld, who landed in Roxbury, Massachusetts in 1638
  • Daniel Weld, who landed in Roxbury, Massachusetts in 1641
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Weld Settlers in United States in the 19th Century

  • Jacob Weld, aged 28, arrived in New York, NY in 1848

Weld Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century

  • George Weld, English convict from Knutsford, Cheshire, who was transported aboard the "Anson" on September 23, 1843, settling in Van Diemen's Land, Australia [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    State Library of Queensland. (Retrieved 2015, January 8) Anson voyage to Van Diemen's Land, Australia in 1843 with 499 passengers. Retrieved from http://www.convictrecords.com.au/ships/anson/1843

Weld Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century

  • John E. Weld arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Wild Duck" in 1869

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Contemporary Notables of the name Weld (post 1700)


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Contemporary Notables of the name Weld (post 1700)



  • William Gordon Weld (1775-1825), American shipmaster and ship owner
  • William Fletcher Weld (1800-1881), American shipping magnate
  • George Walker Weld (1840-1905), American founding member of the Boston Athletic Association and financier of the Weld Boathouse
  • Susan Ker "Tuesday" Weld (b. 1943), American Golden Globe, Academy Award, BAFTA and Emmy Award winning actress
  • Joseph Weld (1777-1863), English aristocrat and boat builder who built "The Arrow", which took part in the first America's Cup race in 1851
  • Thomas Weld (1773-1837), English Roman Catholic bishop and cardinal, eldest son of Thomas Weld
  • Thomas Weld of Lulworth Castle (1750-1810), English philanthropist who gave Stonyhurst College with 30 acres to exiled Jesuits
  • Sir Frederick Aloysius Weld (1823-1891), New Zealand politician, sixth Premier of New Zealand, Governor of Western Australia and Governor of Tasmania
  • Dermot K. Weld (b. 1948), Irish racehorse trainer who holds the record for the most winners trained in Ireland (2, 578 set in August 2000)
  • William Floyd Weld (b. 1945), Republican Governor of Massachusetts from 1991 to 1997

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Motto


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Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Nil sine numine
Motto Translation: Nothing without the Deity.


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Weld Family Crest Products


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Weld Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



  1. ^ Shirley, Evelyn Philip, The Noble and Gentle Men of England; The Arms and Descents. Westminster: John Bower Nichols and Sons, 1866, Print.
  2. ^ State Library of Queensland. (Retrieved 2015, January 8) Anson voyage to Van Diemen's Land, Australia in 1843 with 499 passengers. Retrieved from http://www.convictrecords.com.au/ships/anson/1843

Other References

  1. Zieber, Eugene. Heraldry in America. Philadelphia: Genealogical Publishing Co. Print.
  2. Shaw, William A. Knights of England A Complete Record from the Earliest Time to the Present Day of the Knights of all the Orders of Chivalry in England, Scotland, Ireland and Knights Bachelors 2 Volumes. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print. (ISBN 080630443X).
  3. Markale, J. Celtic Civilization. London: Gordon & Cremonesi, 1976. Print.
  4. Library of Congress. American and English Genealogies in the Library of Congress. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1967. Print.
  5. Filby, P. William and Mary K Meyer. Passenger and Immigration Lists Index in Four Volumes. Detroit: Gale Research, 1985. Print. (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8).
  6. The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X).
  7. Foster, Joseph. Dictionary of Heraldry Feudal Coats of Arms and Pedigrees. London: Bracken Books, 1989. Print. (ISBN 1-85170-309-8).
  8. Le Patourel, John. The Norman Empire. New York: Oxford University Press, 1976. Print. (ISBN 0-19-822525-3).
  9. Samuelsen, W. David. New York City Passenger List Manifests Index 1820 - 1824. North Salt Lake, Utah: Accelerated Indexing Systems International, 1986. Print.
  10. Crispin, M. Jackson and Leonce Mary. Falaise Roll Recording Prominent Companions of William Duke of Normandy at the Conquest of England. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
  11. ...

The Weld Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Weld Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 31 July 2016 at 20:28.

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