Valo History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Early Origins of the Valo family

The surname Valo was first found in Valognes on the Cotentin peninsula. While the name remains a strong French name even to today, some of the family migrated to England as we shall soon discover.

"Peter de Valognes or Vallonis received from the Conqueror fifty-seven lordships in the counties of Essex, Norfolk, Suffolk, Hertford, Cambridge, and Lincoln, and built his castle at Orford in Suffolk. He was Viscount of Essex 1087; and with his wife Albreda, the daughter of Hubert de Rie, founded Binham Priory in Norfolk 'for the welfare of the souls of William the Conqueror and Maud his Queen, and for the good estate of Henry I.' " [1]

"Philip de Valoniis, the fifth son, also came into Scotland, towards the end of the reign of Malcolm IV. He was a constant attendant on William the Lion, and was one of the hostages for his liberation. In recompence, the King made him a grant of the manors of Panmure and Benvie, and appointed him High Chamberlain of Scotland about 1180. He witnessed the agreement betwixt King William I. and King John in 1209; was continued Chamberlain by Alexander II. on his accession, 1214: and dying on the 5th of November 1215, was interred with great solemnity in the chapter-house of Melrose." [2]

Early History of the Valo family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Valo research. Another 275 words (20 lines of text) covering the years 1282, 1376, 1394, 1435, 1575, 1652, 1623, 1710, 1630, 1590, 1585, 1616, 1812, 1904, 1659, 1719, 1652, 1724, 1688 and 1767 are included under the topic Early Valo History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Valo Spelling Variations

One can encounter great variation in the spelling of French surnames; in part, as spelling, and the spelling names was not yet standardized during the early development of the written French language. Later, there was much branching and movement of families, and spellings would change according to region. Variations of the name Valo include Valon, Valons, Valone, Valones, Vallon, Vallons, Vallone, Vallones, Valonne, Valonnes, Vallonne, Vallonnes, Valont, Valonts, Valond, Valonds, Valonde, Valondes, Walon, Walons, Wallon, Wallons, de Valon and many more.

Early Notables of the Valo family (pre 1700)

Notable amongst the family in this period was Jacques-Louis, Marquis of Mimeure, Field Marshal, member of the French Academy; and Jacques Louis Valon, Marquis de Mimeure (1659-1719), a French...
Another 29 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Valo Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Valo family

Migration from France to New France or Quebec as it was now more popularly called, continued from France until it fell in 1759. By 1675, there were 7000 French in Quebec. By the same year the Acadian presence in Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island had reached 500. In the treaty of Utrecht, the Acadians were ceded by France to Britain in 1713. In 1755, 10,000 French Acadians refused to take an oath of allegiance to England and were deported. They found refuge in Louisiana. In 1793, the remaining French in these provinces came under British rule. Meanwhile, in Quebec, the French race flourished, founding in Lower Canada, one of the two great solitudes which became Canada. Many of this distinguished family name Valo were prominent in social, cultural, religious and political affairs in France and New France. Amongst the settlers in North America with this distinguished name Valo were Louis Vallon settled in Philadelphia in 1804; Antoine Vallone settled in Philadelphia in 1880.



The Valo Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Malo mori quam foedari
Motto Translation: I would rather die than be disgraced.


  1. ^ The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)
  2. ^ Cleveland, Dutchess of The Battle Abbey Roll with some Account of the Norman Lineages. London: John Murray, Abermarle Street, 1889. Print. Volume 3 of 3


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