Stanyer History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Early Origins of the Stanyer family

The surname Stanyer was first found in Oxfordshire at Stonor, a Saxon village that dates back to the late 10th century when it was named Stanora. Literally the place name means "stony hill-slope," from the Old English words "stan" + "ora" [1]

Stonor Park is an historic country house and private deer park situated nearby and has been the home of the Stonor family for more than eight centuries. It is generally thought that the house was probably begun after 1280 when Sir Richard Stoner (1250-1314) married his second wife, Margaret Harnhull.

The following quote is a particular interest and reflects the family's ancient heritage. We provide the quote as it was recorded in the language of the times: "Stonor is a 3 miles out of Henley. Ther is a fayre parke and a warren of connies and fayre woods. The mansion place standithe clyminge on a hille, and hathe 2 courtes buyldyd withe tymbar, brike, and flynte; Sir Walter Stoner, now possessor of it, hathe augmentyd and strengthed the howse. The Stoners hathe longe had it in possessyn syns one Fortescue invadyd it by marriage of an heire generall of the Sonors, but after dispocessed." [2]

John de Stoner (died 1354), was an early English jurist, "probably born at Stonor, near Sandwich, Kent, for in 1316 he took a release of the lands of Robert de Dumbleton in that county. He was, however, also connected with the manor of Stonor, near Dorchester, Oxfordshire, in the church of which place there is the effigy of a judge bearing his arms. " [3]

Early History of the Stanyer family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Stanyer research. Another 130 words (9 lines of text) covering the years 1200, 1334 and 1492 are included under the topic Early Stanyer History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Stanyer Spelling Variations

Spelling variations of this family name include: Stonor, Stoner, Stonore and others.

Early Notables of the Stanyer family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Stanyer Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


New Zealand Stanyer migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Stanyer Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Thomas Stanyer, aged 34, a bootmaker, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Waitangi" in 1874
  • Ellen Stanyer, aged 34, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Waitangi" in 1874
  • Alice Stanyer, aged 3, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Waitangi" in 1874
  • Ellen Stanyer, aged 15, a housemaid, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Waitangi" in 1874
  • Louisa Stanyer, aged 13, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Waitangi" in 1874


  1. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
  2. ^ Shirley, Evelyn Philip, The Noble and Gentle Men of England; The Arms and Descents. Westminster: John Bower Nichols and Sons, 1866, Print.
  3. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print


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