Pawson History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Early Origins of the Pawson family

The surname Pawson was first found in Yorkshire. The township of Shawdon in Northumberland was home to an early branch of the family. "The township is intersected by the road from Morpeth to Wooler, and comprises about 1200 acres of land, mostly arable, the property of William Pawson, Esq., whose mansion here is surrounded with excellent wood." [1]

Early History of the Pawson family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Pawson research. Another 88 words (6 lines of text) covering the years 1614 and 1675 are included under the topic Early Pawson History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Pawson Spelling Variations

Spelling variations of this family name include: Pawson, Payson and others.

Early Notables of the Pawson family (pre 1700)

Another 32 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Pawson Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Pawson migration to the United States +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Pawson Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • John Pawson, who landed in Maryland in 1668 [2]
Pawson Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • George Pawson, who arrived in New York in 1824 [2]
  • James Pawson who arrived in Philadelphia in 1844

Australia Pawson migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Pawson Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Matthew Pawson, English convict who was convicted in Devonport, Plymouth, Devon, England for 7 years, transported aboard the "Bangalore" on 28th March 1848, arriving in Tasmania (Van Diemen's Land) from Bermuda [3]

New Zealand Pawson migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Pawson Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • John Pawson, aged 32, a carpenter, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Coromandel" in 1840
  • Mary Ann Pawson, aged 29, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Coromandel" in 1840
  • William Pawson, aged 12, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Coromandel" in 1840
  • Sarah Ann Pawson, aged 9, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Coromandel" in 1840
  • John Pawson, aged 7, who arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Coromandel" in 1840
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name Pawson (post 1700) +

  • Les Pawson (1905-1992), American marathon runner
  • John David Pawson (1930-2020), English evangelical minister, writer and prominent Bible teacher
  • Mr. John Ward Pawson C.B.E. (b. 1949), born in Halifax, Yorkshire, England, English Architectural Designer, was appointed Commander of the Order of the British Empire on 29th December 2018 for services to Design and Architecture by Her Majesty The Queen [4]
  • Henry Anthony "Tony" Pawson OBE (1921-2012), English cricketer and cricket writer
  • Albert Guy Pawson (1888-1986), English cricketer
  • Francis William Pawson (b. 1861), English footballer
  • Anthony James "Tony" Pawson OC , OOnt , CH , FRS , FRSC (b. 1952), British-born Canadian scientist, co-winner of the 2005 Wolf Prize in Medicine
  • David Pawson (b. 1930), British Bible teacher
  • John Pawson (b. 1949), British architect and designer


The Pawson Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Favente Deo
Motto Translation: I will defend my God.


  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  2. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  3. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 15th September 2020). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/bangalore
  4. ^ "Birthday and New Year Honours Lists (1940 to 2019)." Issue 62507, 28 December 2018 | London Gazette, The Gazette, Dec. 2018, www.thegazette.co.uk/honours-lists


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