Haskew History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Early Origins of the Haskew family

The surname Haskew was first found in the county of Cumberland, however some of the family were found at Aughton in the East Riding of Yorkshire in early times.

"The church [of Aughton], the chancel of which was rebuilt in 1839, has a low embattled tower, built by Christopher, son of the unfortunate Robert Aske who was beheaded at York in the reign of Henry VIII., 1537, as a principal in the insurrection called the "Pilgrimage of Grace," occasioned by the suppression of the monasteries. On the chancel floor is a fine brass slab, on which are graven the effigies of Richard Aske and his lady, who died in the fifteenth century. Near the east bank of the river Derwent the moats and trenches of an ancient castle are still visible; and in the vicinity of the church is a large mound of earth, the site of the castellated mansion of the Aske family." [1]

Eske is a township, in the parish of St. John, Beverley, union of Beverley, N. division of the wapentake of Holderness, in the East Riding of Yorkshire. "This place, in Domesday Book Asche, derives its name from the British word signifying water. It was given at an early period to the collegiate church of St. John." [1]

Early History of the Haskew family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Haskew research. Another 141 words (10 lines of text) covering the years 1350, 1590, 1911, 1521, 1546, 1540, 1438, 1450, 1558, 1590, 1641, 1624, 1596, 1654, 1618, 1668, 1659, 1550, 1616, 1616, 1671, 1618, 1668, 1659, 1619, 1689, 1650, 1699, 1685, 1699, 1699 and 1774 are included under the topic Early Haskew History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Haskew Spelling Variations

During the era when a person's name, tribe and posterity was one of his most important possessions, many different spellings were found in the archives examined. Haskew occurred in many references, and spelling variations of the name found included Askey, Aske, Askew, Aiscough, Ayscoghe, Asker, Ayscough, Aiskey and many more.

Early Notables of the Haskew family (pre 1700)

Notable amongst the family name during their early history was Anne Askew (1521-1546), English poet and Protestant who was condemned as a heretic, the only woman to have been both tortured in the Tower of London and burnt at the stake; William Ayscough (or Aiscough), (died 1540), Bishop of Salisbury (1438-1450); Edward Ayscough (died 1558), cup-bearer to Henry VIII; Edward Ayscough (of Nuthall) (c.1590- c.1641), Member of Parliament for Stamford in 1624; Edward Ayscough (1596-c. 1654), Member of Parliament for Lincoln and Lincolnshire; Edward Ayscough (c.1618-1668), English Member of Parliament for Great Grimsby in 1659; Edward...
Another 96 words (7 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Haskew Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


Australia Haskew migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Haskew Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Mr. John Haskew, English convict who was convicted in London, England for 7 years, transported aboard the "Elphinstone" on 28th July 1842, arriving in Tasmania (Van Diemen's Land) [2]

Contemporary Notables of the name Haskew (post 1700) +

  • Renée Haskew, American researcher at the Center for Neuropharmacology and Neuroscience, Albany Medical College, Albany
  • Dr. Timothy A. Haskew, American professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa
  • Nathan Haskew, American actor and director, known for Trial of Leaves (2013) and Pavel Hall (2012)
  • Patrick Haskew, American Visual Effects specialist, known for his work on Avengers: Infinity War (2018), The Avengers (2012), Iron Man 3 (2013) and Avengers: Age of Ultron (2015)


The Haskew Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Fac et spera
Motto Translation: Do and hope.


  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  2. ^ Convict Records Voyages to Australia (Retrieved 23rd March 2022). Retrieved from https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/elphinstone


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