× Home
×

Family Crest and History Search
House of Names
FREE SHIPPING on orders of $85 or more
An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright © 2000 - 2016


The distinguished and ancient surname Haig is Old English in origin, and traces its history back to the Middle Ages, when the island of Britain was inhabited by the Anglo-Saxons. The name is derived from the Old English "haga" or the Old Norse "hagi," which both mean "dweller by the haw." It is likely that the name was first borne by someone who lived near a hedged field or enclosure. Although now the name is pronounced as a single syllable, it was originally pronounced as two, as can be seen from the spelling “Hag-he”. Most likely, the second syllable was a hard “g” sound; the name was probably pronounced “hah-geh”.

Haig Early Origins



The surname Haig was first found in Yorkshire, where Jollan de Hagh was recorded in 1229. The Scottish branch lived in Bemersyde for many centuries after their arrival in Scotland.

Close

Haig Spelling Variations


Expand

Haig Spelling Variations



The name, Haig, occurred in many references, and from time to time, it was spelt Haig, Haigh, Hague, Hait, Haight, Hate, Haga and others.

Close

Haig Early History


Expand

Haig Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Haig research. Another 185 words (13 lines of text) covering the years 1800 and 1861 are included under the topic Early Haig History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Close

Haig Early Notables (pre 1700)


Expand

Haig Early Notables (pre 1700)



Another 21 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Haig Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Close

The Great Migration


Expand

The Great Migration



The New World beckoned settlers from the Scottish-English borders. They sailed aboard the armada of sailing ships known as the "White Sails" which plied the stormy Atlanti c. Some called them, less romantically, the "coffin ships." Among the early settlers bearing the Haig surname who came to North America were:

Haig Settlers in United States in the 19th Century

  • Thomas Haig, who arrived in America in 1808
  • James Haig, who arrived in Charleston, South Carolina in 1821
  • Walter Haig, who landed in Allegany (Allegheny) County, Pennsylvania in 1869
  • Robert Haig, who landed in St Clair County, Illinois in 1872
  • George Haig, who landed in St Clair County, Illinois in 1872
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Haig Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century

  • Agnes Haig, Scottish convict from Glasgow, who was transported aboard the "Arab" on December 14, 1835, settling in Van Diemen's Land, Australia [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
    State Library of Queensland. (Retrieved 2015, January 8) Arab voyage to Van Diemen's Land, Australia in 1835 with 132 passengers. Retrieved from http://www.convictrecords.com.au/ships/arab/1835

Close

Contemporary Notables of the name Haig (post 1700)


Expand

Contemporary Notables of the name Haig (post 1700)



  • John A. Haig, American Republican politician, Alternate Delegate to Republican National Convention from New York, 1892
  • J. Frederick Haig, American Republican politician, Member of Connecticut State House of Representatives from Middletown, 1939-40
  • Alexander Meigs Haig Jr. (1924-2010), American Republican politician, U.S. Secretary of State, 1981-82; Candidate for Republican nomination for President, 1988
  • General Alexander Meigs Haig Jr. (1924-2010), American Army general who served as the U.S. Secretary of State under President Ronald Reagan and is a recipient of the Distinguished Service Cross
  • David Haig (b. 1955), Olivier Award-winning English actor
  • Shirley Ethel Haig (b. 1950), retired New Zealand field hockey player
  • Jack Haig (1913-1989), British actor
  • David Haig, Australian biologist
  • Sir Douglas Haig (1861-1928), 1st Earl Haig, a British Field Marshal during World War I

Close

Motto


Expand

Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Sola Virtus Invicta
Motto Translation: Virtue alone is invincible


Close

Haig Family Crest Products


Expand

Haig Family Crest Products




Close

See Also


Expand

See Also




Close

Citations


Expand

Citations



  1. ^ State Library of Queensland. (Retrieved 2015, January 8) Arab voyage to Van Diemen's Land, Australia in 1835 with 132 passengers. Retrieved from http://www.convictrecords.com.au/ships/arab/1835

Other References

  1. Reaney P.H and R.M. Wilson. A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X).
  2. Samuelsen, W. David. New York City Passenger List Manifests Index 1820 - 1824. North Salt Lake, Utah: Accelerated Indexing Systems International, 1986. Print.
  3. Foster, Joseph. Dictionary of Heraldry Feudal Coats of Arms and Pedigrees. London: Bracken Books, 1989. Print. (ISBN 1-85170-309-8).
  4. Bolton, Charles Knowles. Bolton's American Armory. Baltimore: Heraldic Book Company, 1964. Print.
  5. Shaw, William A. Knights of England A Complete Record from the Earliest Time to the Present Day of the Knights of all the Orders of Chivalry in England, Scotland, Ireland and Knights Bachelors 2 Volumes. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print. (ISBN 080630443X).
  6. Colletta, John P. They Came In Ships. Salt Lake City: Ancestry, 1993. Print.
  7. Leeson, Francis L. Dictionary of British Peerages. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1986. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-1121-5).
  8. Virkus, Frederick A. Ed. Immigrant Ancestors A List of 2,500 Immigrants to America Before 1750. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1964. Print.
  9. Bullock, L.G. Historical Map of England and Wales. Edinburgh: Bartholomew and Son, 1971. Print.
  10. Innes, Thomas and Learney. The Tartans of the Clans and Families of Scotland 1st Edition. Edinburgh: W & A. K. Johnston Limited, 1938. Print.
  11. ...

The Haig Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Haig Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 1 December 2015 at 14:51.

Sign Up

  


FREE SHIPPING on orders of $85 or more
House of Names on Facebook
Follow Houseofnames on Twitter
Houseofnames on Pinterest