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Ashburton History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



Early Origins of the Ashburton family


The surname Ashburton was first found in Devon at Ashburton, a small town on the south-southeastern edge of Dartmoor which dates back to the Domesday Book of 1086 where it was listed as Essebretone. [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
Originally a borough, markettown, and parish, in the union of Newton-Abbott, hundred of Teignbridge. "This town, anciently called Aisbertone, in the time of Edward the Confessor belonged to Brietric, and at the Conquest to Judael de Totnais." [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
By 1328, it was made a stannary town by charter of Edward III and by that time had already be well known for its mines of tin and copper. By the time of Charles I, it was property of the crown and he bestowed the manor upon his son Charles, when he created him Prince of Wales. Literally the place name means "farmstead or village by the stream where ash-trees grow" from the Old English words "aesc" + "burna" + "tun." [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
Hence, conjecturally, the surname is descended from the tenant of the lands of Ashburton, held by a steward of the Bishop of Exeter who was recorded in the Domesday Book.

Early History of the Ashburton family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Ashburton research.
Another 75 words (5 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Ashburton History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ashburton Spelling Variations


Anglo-Norman names are characterized by a multitude of spelling variations. When the Normans became the ruling people of England in the 11th century, they introduced a new language into a society where the main languages of Old and later Middle English had no definite spelling rules. These languages were more often spoken than written, so they blended freely with one another. Contributing to this mixing of tongues was the fact that medieval scribes spelled words according to sound, ensuring that a person's name would appear differently in nearly every document in which it was recorded. The name has been spelled Ashburton, Ashberton, Asburton, Asburton and many more.

Early Notables of the Ashburton family (pre 1700)


More information is included under the topic Early Ashburton Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Ashburton family to the New World and Oceana


For many English families, the political and religious disarray that plagued their homeland made the frontiers of the New World an attractive prospect. Thousands migrated, aboard cramped disease-ridden ships. They arrived sick, poor, and hungry, but were welcomed in many cases with far greater opportunity than at home in England. Many of these hardy settlers went on to make important contributions to the emerging nations in which they landed. Among early immigrants bearing the name Ashburton or a variant listed above were:

Ashburton Settlers in United States in the 20th Century

  • Lady Ashburton, aged 23, who emigrated to the United States from Almford, England, in 1907
  • Lady Ashburton, aged 28, who landed in America from England, London, in 1912
  • Frances Ashburton, aged 27, who settled in America from London, England, in 1912
  • Frances Ashburton, aged 35, who landed in America from Alresford Hants., England, in 1919
  • Frances Ashburton, aged 35, who emigrated to the United States from England, in 1925

Ashburton Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  2. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  3. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)

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