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Ansynd History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



The surname Ansynd is a baptismal name as in "the son of Anne" or the name could have been derived from one of the villages names North and South Anston in Yorkshire. Both villages date back to before the Domesday Book. They were listed there as Anestan and Litelanstan and were owned by Roger de Bully at that time. [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
In this case, the name Anston is thought to derive from the Old English ana + stan which meant "single or solitary stone." [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)


Early Origins of the Ansynd family


The surname Ansynd was first found in Lancashire. However, another branch of the family were found since early times at the township of Shugborough in Staffordshire. " The family of Anson have been seated in the county for many generations. William Anson having purchased the manor in the reign of James I., made it his principal seat; and here, in 1697, was born the distinguished admiral and circumnavigator, George, Lord Anson, who was raised to the peerage, by the title of Lord Anson, in 1747. The vale of Shugborough owes many of its beauties to the late Viscount Anson, father of the present peer, who was elevated to the rank of Earl of Lichfield in September 1831." [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

Early History of the Ansynd family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Ansynd research.
Another 61 words (4 lines of text) covering the years 1697, 1762, 1769, 1849, 1797, 1857 and 1857 are included under the topic Early Ansynd History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ansynd Spelling Variations


Only recently has spelling become standardized in the English language. As the English language evolved in the Middle Ages, the spelling of names changed also. The name Ansynd has undergone many spelling variations, including Anson, Hanson, Ansen, Eanson, Ansin and others.

Early Notables of the Ansynd family (pre 1700)


Notables of this surname at this time include: George Anson, 1st Baron Anson (1697-1762), English admiral, noted for his circumnavigation of the globe; General Sir George Anson (1769-1849)...
Another 27 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Ansynd Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Ansynd family to the New World and Oceana


To escape the unstable social climate in England of this time, many families boarded ships for the New World with the hope of finding land, opportunity, and greater religious and political freedom. Although the voyages were expensive, crowded, and difficult, those families that arrived often found greater opportunities and freedoms than they could have experienced at home. Many of those families went on to make significant contributions to the rapidly developing colonies in which they settled. Early North American records indicate many people bearing the name Ansynd were among those contributors: Wm. Anson, who came to Virginia in 1678; Richard Anson, who came to Maryland in 1681; Andrew Anson, who settled in America in 1749; George Anson, age 21, who arrived in Maryland in 1775.

The Ansynd Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Nil desperandum
Motto Translation: Never despairing.


Ansynd Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  2. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
  3. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.


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