× Home
×

Family Crest and History Search
House of Names
FREE SHIPPING on orders of $85 or more
An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2016


The name Worbeltomb arrived in England after the Norman Conquest of 1066. The Worbeltomb family lived in Cheshire, at the village and parish of Warburton, which was acquired by the Duttons as early as temp. Henry II, but it was not until the reign of Edward I., or II., that this territorial name was assumed by Sir Peter de Dutton. [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.


Worbeltomb Early Origins



The surname Worbeltomb was first found in Cheshire at Warburton, now part of Greater Manchester, where they were descended from Sir Peter de Dutton, a Crusade knight, who in turn was descended from Rollo, the first invader and Duke of Normandy in 890. His Family Crest "a Saracen's head is still borne by the Warburtons referring to the Holy Land, and probably gained by some heroic exploit in the expedition. " [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
The source continues by referring to an earlier source: "This Galfrid lived in 1244. He was servynge his prynce, and vanquyshed a Sarrazin in combate - then begynnynge to seale with a Sarrasins's head" [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
Reader's Note: a seal(e) was typically an early form of a crest. Yet another source claims the family is descended from William of Eu, through Odard, nephew of Lupus, great Earl of Chester, who was a nephew of William the Conqueror. They were granted the barony of Dutton at the Conquest in 1066. [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
The Domesday Book also lists the spelling of the place name as Wareburgetune. Literally, the place name means "farmstead or village of a woman called Waerburh," having derived from the Old English personal name + tun. [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)

Close

Worbeltomb Spelling Variations


Expand

Worbeltomb Spelling Variations



A multitude of spelling variations characterize Norman surnames. Many variations occurred because Old and Middle English lacked any definite spelling rules. The introduction of Norman French to England also had a pronounced effect, as did the court languages of Latin and French. Therefore, one person was often referred to by several different spellings in a single lifetime. The various spellings include Warburton, Warbleton, Wareburton and others.

Close

Worbeltomb Early History


Expand

Worbeltomb Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Worbeltomb research. Another 333 words (24 lines of text) covering the years 1290, 1572, 1550, 1588, 1666, 1622, 1676, 1698, 1675, 1743, 1698 and 1779 are included under the topic Early Worbeltomb History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Close

Worbeltomb Early Notables (pre 1700)


Expand

Worbeltomb Early Notables (pre 1700)



Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Sir Peter Warburton (d. 1550) of Arley, Cheshire; and his grandson, Peter Warburton (1588-1666), an English barrister and judge; Sir George Warburton, 1st Baronet (1622-1676), first of the Warburton Baronetcy, of Arley in the County of Chester; Sir Peter Warburton, 2nd Baronet (died...

Another 51 words (4 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Worbeltomb Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Close

Worbeltomb In Ireland


Expand

Worbeltomb In Ireland



Some of the Worbeltomb family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. Another 85 words (6 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Close

The Great Migration


Expand

The Great Migration



Many English families left England, to avoid the chaos of their homeland and migrated to the many British colonies abroad. Although the conditions on the ships were extremely cramped, and some travelers arrived diseased, starving, and destitute, once in the colonies, many of the families prospered and made valuable contributions to the cultures of what would become the United States and Canada. Research into the origins of individual families in North America has revealed records of the immigration of a number of people bearing the name Worbeltomb or a variant listed above: Ann Warburton and her husband who settled in Virginia in 1656; Thomas Warbleton settled in Virginia in 1653(probably the husband of Ann); Edie Warburton settled in Maryland in 1718.

Close

Motto


Expand

Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Je voil droyt avoyre
Motto Translation: I will have justice.


Close

Worbeltomb Family Crest Products


Expand

Worbeltomb Family Crest Products




Close

See Also


Expand

See Also




Close

Citations


Expand

Citations



  1. ^ Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  2. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  3. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)

Other References

  1. Robb H. Amanda and Andrew Chesler. Encyclopedia of American Family Names. New York: Haper Collins, 1995. Print. (ISBN 0-06-270075-8).
  2. Foster, Joseph. Dictionary of Heraldry Feudal Coats of Arms and Pedigrees. London: Bracken Books, 1989. Print. (ISBN 1-85170-309-8).
  3. Reaney P.H and R.M. Wilson. A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X).
  4. Dunkling, Leslie. Dictionary of Surnames. Toronto: Collins, 1998. Print. (ISBN 0004720598).
  5. Burke, Sir Bernard. Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Peerage and Baronetage, The Privy Council, Knightage and Compainonage. London: Burke Publishing, 1921. Print.
  6. Papworth, J.W and A.W Morant. Ordinary of British Armorials. London: T.Richards, 1874. Print.
  7. Samuelsen, W. David. New York City Passenger List Manifests Index 1820 - 1824. North Salt Lake, Utah: Accelerated Indexing Systems International, 1986. Print.
  8. Cook, Chris. English Historical Facts 1603-1688. London: MacMillan, 1980. Print.
  9. Filby, P. William and Mary K Meyer. Passenger and Immigration Lists Index in Four Volumes. Detroit: Gale Research, 1985. Print. (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8).
  10. The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X).
  11. ...

The Worbeltomb Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Worbeltomb Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 9 March 2016 at 16:21.

Sign Up

  


FREE SHIPPING on orders of $85 or more
House of Names on Facebook
Follow Houseofnames on Twitter
Houseofnames on Pinterest