Washborn History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The name Washborn was brought to England in the great wave of migration following the Norman Conquest of 1066. The Washborn family lived at Washbourne in Devon. [1] The Domesday Book lists the village as Waseborne [2] and literally meant "stream used for washing (sheep or clothes.)" [3]

Alternatively, the name could have originated at Washburn, in Yorkshire or at Great Washbourne or Little Washbourne, parishes in Gloucestershire. [4] The Gloucestershire parishes actually date back to Saxon times when they were collectively known as Uassanburnan in 780. By the time of the Domesday Book both were known Waseborne. [2]

Early Origins of the Washborn family

The surname Washborn was first found in Devon where it is related the family took their name from Waseborne, now Wasbourne in that county soon after the Norman Conquest in 1066. This village was granted to Hermer from Gotshelm. [1]

By the end of the 11th century they had branched to Worcestershire where they became a family great consequence. They were generations of knights at the Manor at the Washbournes intermarring with the distinguished families of Zouch, Corbett, Wysham, Blount and the Earls of Warwick. Sir Roger Washbourne is the first on record.

Early rolls reveal Williara de Wasseburn listed in the Pipe Rolls for Worcestershire in 1204. John Washburn was found in the Subsidy Rolls for Worcestershire c. 1280 and William de Wasshebourn was found in the Feet of Fines for Yorkshire in 1333. [1]

The Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 list William de Wassebourn in Huntingdonshire and Anthony Washbourne from Worcestershire was registered at Oxford University (no date given.) [5]

Early History of the Washborn family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Washborn research. Another 126 words (9 lines of text) covering the years 1598, 1599, 1616, 1631, 1606, 1687, 1654, 1760, 1829, 1824, 1759, 1760, 1829 and 1833 are included under the topic Early Washborn History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Washborn Spelling Variations

Endless spelling variations are a prevailing characteristic of Norman surnames. Old and Middle English lacked any definite spelling rules, and the introduction of Norman French added an unfamiliar ingredient to the English linguistic stew. French and Latin, the languages of the court, also influenced spellings. Finally, Medieval scribes generally spelled words according to how they sounded, so one person was often referred to by different spellings in different documents. The name has been spelled Washbourne, Washburn, Washborne, Washborn and others.

Early Notables of the Washborn family (pre 1700)

Outstanding amongst the family at this time was William Washbourne, High Sheriff of Montgomeryshire in 1631; and Thomas Washbourne (1606-1687), an English clergyman and poet, Canon of Gloucester, best known for his 1654 book Divine Poems. "He was younger son of John Washbourne of Wichenford, Worcestershire. The Washbourne family had been settled in Gloucestershire for several centuries. " [6] John Washbourn (1760?-1829), was a local historian, son of John Washbourn (d. 1824?) and was descended from an ancient Gloucestershire family (Burke...
Another 80 words (6 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Washborn Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Washborn migration to the United States +

To escape the political and religious persecution within England at the time, many English families left for the various British colonies abroad. The voyage was extremely difficult, though, and the cramped, dank ships caused many to arrive in the New World diseased and starving. But for those who made it, the trip was most often worth it. Many of the families who arrived went on to make valuable contributions to the emerging nations of Canada and the United States. An inquiry into the early roots of North American families reveals a number of immigrants bearing the name Washborn or a variant listed above:

Washborn Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Margerie Washborn, who settled in Boston Massachusettsin 1635 with her two sons, Joe, and Phillip
  • Margerie Washborn, aged 49, who arrived in New England in 1635 [7]
  • Miss Margerie Washborn, (b. 1586), aged 49, British settler from Evesham, Worcestershire travelling from London, England aboard the ship "Elizabeth and Anne" arriving in Massachusetts Bay (Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire) in 1635 [8]


  1. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  2. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  3. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
  4. ^ Smith, Eldson Coles, New Dictionary of American Family Names New York: Harper & Row, 1956. Print
  5. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  6. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print
  7. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  8. ^ Pilgrim Ship Lists Early 1600's retrieved 24th September 2021. (Retrieved from https://www.packrat-pro.com/ships/shiplist.htm)


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