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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2016


The Norman Conquest of England of 1066 added many new elements to the already vibrant culture. Among these were thousands of new names. The Tailbut name is derived from the Germanic personal name Talabert, meaning bright valley.

Tailbut Early Origins



The surname Tailbut was first found in Shropshire, Staffordshire and Yorkshire. "This great historical family is traced to the Conquest, Richard Talbot, living at that period, being the first recorded ancestor. " [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Shirley, Evelyn Philip, The Noble and Gentle Men of England; The Arms and Descents. Westminster: John Bower Nichols and Sons, 1866, Print.
In Normandy, their place of origin, the name was originally listed as D'Eu, a baronial name. [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)
William Talebot "came to England in 1066, and had 1. Richard; 2. Geoffrey, ancestor of Lord Talbot of Malahide. Richard in 1086 held in Bedford from Walter Giffard, Baron of Bolde c. " [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)
[3]CITATION[CLOSE]
Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
The chapelry of Salebury played an important part in the story of the family history. "In the reign of Edward II. a charter for free warren in this manor was granted to Sir Robert de Cliderhou, whose daughter occurs as owner of the manor in 1406. Isabella, her daughter, conveyed the manor in marriage to John Talbot, of Bashall. Their son was instrumental to the betrayal of Henry VI., whose apprehension is said to have occurred here, though Leland fixes the scene in Cletherwoode. However this may be, letters-patent were granted to him by Edward IV. for a pension of twenty marks out of the duchy revenues. In this odious service, Sir James Haryngton was the principal actor, and the Talbots his subordinate agents. John Talbot, the last male heir of the family, left a daughter, married to Edward Warren of Poynton, from whose family the manor passed by marriage: it now belongs to Lord de Tabley. " [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
Another branch of the family was found at Alveton in Staffordshire. "The extensive manor of Alton became the property of John Talbot, first earl of Shrewsbury, by his marriage with the heiress of the Furnival family, and has remained with his descendants to the present time." [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
The township of Bashall-Eaves in the West Riding of Yorkshire was home to another family seat. "This place, long distinguished as the residence of the Talbots, has been variously designated Beckshalgh, Batsalve, Bakesholf, and Bashall. " [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

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Tailbut Spelling Variations


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Tailbut Spelling Variations



A multitude of spelling variations characterize Norman surnames. Many variations occurred because Old and Middle English lacked any definite spelling rules. The introduction of Norman French to England also had a pronounced effect, as did the court languages of Latin and French. Therefore, one person was often referred to by several different spellings in a single lifetime. The various spellings include Talbot, Talbott, Talbut, Talbart, Talbert and many more.

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Tailbut Early History


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Tailbut Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Tailbut research. Another 421 words (30 lines of text) covering the years 1172, 1453, 1384, 1453, 1417, 1460, 1456, 1458, 1457, 1630, 1714, 1623, 1667, 1642, 1702, 1659, 1668, 1660, 1718, 1710, 1715, 1714, 1633, 1630, 1691, 1620, 1680 and 1669 are included under the topic Early Tailbut History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Tailbut Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Tailbut Early Notables (pre 1700)



Outstanding amongst the family at this time was William Talbot at the Battle of Hastings; John Talbot, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury and 1st Earl of Waterford KG (1384-1453), known as "Old Talbot", an important English military commander during the Hundred Years' War, as well as the only Lancastrian Constable of France...

Another 117 words (8 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Tailbut Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Tailbut In Ireland


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Tailbut In Ireland



Some of the Tailbut family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. Another 155 words (11 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



Many English families left England, to avoid the chaos of their homeland and migrated to the many British colonies abroad. Although the conditions on the ships were extremely cramped, and some travelers arrived diseased, starving, and destitute, once in the colonies, many of the families prospered and made valuable contributions to the cultures of what would become the United States and Canada. Research into the origins of individual families in North America has revealed records of the immigration of a number of people bearing the name Tailbut or a variant listed above: George Talbot settled in Trinity, Newfoundland, in 1675; John Talbot settled in St. Pierre, Newfoundland in 1714; Christopher Talbot settled in New England in 1663.

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Motto


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Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Prest d'accomplir
Motto Translation: Ready to accomplish.


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Tailbut Family Crest Products


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Tailbut Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



  1. ^ Shirley, Evelyn Philip, The Noble and Gentle Men of England; The Arms and Descents. Westminster: John Bower Nichols and Sons, 1866, Print.
  2. ^ The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)
  3. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  4. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

Other References

  1. Leeson, Francis L. Dictionary of British Peerages. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1986. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-1121-5).
  2. Marcharn, Frederick George. A Constitutional History of Modern England 1485 to the Present. London: Harper and Brothers, 1960. Print.
  3. Cook, Chris. English Historical Facts 1603-1688. London: MacMillan, 1980. Print.
  4. Papworth, J.W and A.W Morant. Ordinary of British Armorials. London: T.Richards, 1874. Print.
  5. Robb H. Amanda and Andrew Chesler. Encyclopedia of American Family Names. New York: Haper Collins, 1995. Print. (ISBN 0-06-270075-8).
  6. Fairbairn. Fairbain's book of Crests of the Families of Great Britain and Ireland, 4th Edition 2 volumes in one. Baltimore: Heraldic Book Company, 1968. Print.
  7. Samuelsen, W. David. New York City Passenger List Manifests Index 1820 - 1824. North Salt Lake, Utah: Accelerated Indexing Systems International, 1986. Print.
  8. Innes, Thomas and Learney. The Tartans of the Clans and Families of Scotland 1st Edition. Edinburgh: W & A. K. Johnston Limited, 1938. Print.
  9. Colletta, John P. They Came In Ships. Salt Lake City: Ancestry, 1993. Print.
  10. MacAulay, Thomas Babington. History of England from the Accession of James the Second 4 volumes. New York: Harper and Brothers, 1879. Print.
  11. ...

The Tailbut Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Tailbut Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 15 March 2016 at 11:17.

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