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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2016


When the ancestors of the Sticklant family emigrated to England following the Norman Conquest in 1066 they brought their family name with them. They lived in Westmorland, at Stirkland.

Sticklant Early Origins



The surname Sticklant was first found in Westmorland at Great Strickland or Little Strickland which dates back to the 12th century when it was named Stircland. The name is derived from the Old English words "stirc" + "land" and meant "cultivated land where young bullocks are kept." [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
Strickland-Ketel and Strickland-Roger were located in the same county. "Descended from Walter de Stirkland, Knight, so called from the pasture-ground of the young cattle, called stirks or steers, in the parish of Morland, in this county; who was living in the reign of Henry III." [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Shirley, Evelyn Philip, The Noble and Gentle Men of England; The Arms and Descents. Westminster: John Bower Nichols and Sons, 1866, Print.
However, some of the family branched to Wintringham in East Riding of Yorkshire in early times. "This parish is situated on the river Derwent, and comprises 8480 acres, of which 5740 are in the township, and, with the exception of the large farm of Linton, exclusively the property of Sir George Strickland, Bart., who is lord of the manor. The living is a donative, in the patronage of Sir George Strickland: the church is in the early English style, with a square embattled tower surmounted by a tall and graceful spire." [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

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Sticklant Spelling Variations


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Sticklant Spelling Variations



Spelling variations in names were a common occurrence in the eras before English spelling was standardized a few hundred years ago. In the Middle Ages, even the literate regularly changed the spellings of their names as the English language incorporated elements of French, Latin, and other European languages. Many variations of the name Sticklant have been found, including Strickland, Stirkland, Stickland and others.

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Sticklant Early History


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Sticklant Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Sticklant research. Another 245 words (18 lines of text) covering the years 1066, 1200, 1400, 1415, 1600, 1671, 1621, 1694, 1419, 1400, 1419, 1598, 1596, 1673, 1665, 1724, 1686, 1735, 1640, 1717, 1685 and 1689 are included under the topic Early Sticklant History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Sticklant Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Sticklant Early Notables (pre 1700)



Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Sir Walter Strickland of Sizergh Hall; Sir Robert Strickland of Sizergh (1600-1671), an English Member of Parliament for Westmorland; Sir Thomas Strickland of Sizergh (1621-1694), supporter of the Royalist cause in the English Civil War; William Strickland (died 1419), an English priest, Bishop...

Another 80 words (6 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Sticklant Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



For many English families, the social climate in England was oppressive and lacked opportunity for change. For such families, the shores of Ireland, Australia, and the New World beckoned. They left their homeland at great expense in ships that were overcrowded and full of disease. Many arrived after the long voyage sick, starving, and without a penny. But even those were greeted with greater opportunity than they could have experienced back home. Numerous English settlers who arrived in the United States and Canada at this time went on to make important contributions to the developing cultures of those countries. Many of those families went on to make significant contributions to the rapidly developing colonies in which they settled. Early North American records indicate many people bearing the name Sticklant were among those contributors: Henry Strickland, who settled in Virginia in 1670; along with Joseph; Henry Strickland, who settled in New Jersey in 1769; Hugh Strickland, who settled in Wilmington, Del. in 1789.

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Motto


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Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Sans mal
Motto Translation: Without evil.


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Sticklant Family Crest Products


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Sticklant Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



  1. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
  2. ^ Shirley, Evelyn Philip, The Noble and Gentle Men of England; The Arms and Descents. Westminster: John Bower Nichols and Sons, 1866, Print.
  3. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

Other References

  1. Matthews, John. Matthews' American Armoury and Blue Book. London: John Matthews, 1911. Print.
  2. Reaney P.H and R.M. Wilson. A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X).
  3. Bede, The Venerable. Historia Ecclesiatica Gentis Anglorum (The Ecclesiastical History Of the English People). Available through Internet Medieval Sourcebook the Fordham University Centre for Medieval Studies. Print.
  4. Weis, Frederick Lewis, Walter Lee Sheppard and David Faris. Ancestral Roots of Sixty Colonists Who Came to New England Between 1623 and 1650 7th Edition. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0806313676).
  5. Chadwick, Nora Kershaw and J.X.W.P Corcoran. The Celts. London: Penguin, 1790. Print. (ISBN 0140212116).
  6. Burke, Sir Bernard. Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Peerage and Baronetage, The Privy Council, Knightage and Compainonage. London: Burke Publishing, 1921. Print.
  7. Best, Hugh. Debrett's Texas Peerage. New York: Coward-McCann, 1983. Print. (ISBN 069811244X).
  8. Elster, Robert J. International Who's Who. London: Europa/Routledge. Print.
  9. MacAulay, Thomas Babington. History of England from the Accession of James the Second 4 volumes. New York: Harper and Brothers, 1879. Print.
  10. Bardsley, C.W. A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6).
  11. ...

The Sticklant Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Sticklant Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 3 March 2016 at 13:30.

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