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The name Shelldyn is of Anglo-Saxon origin and came from when a family lived in various places named Sheldon including Derbyshire, Devon, Warwickshire and the West Midlands. The first portion of the surname Shelldyn is derived from the Old English scylf meaning shelf. The second portion was originally derived from the Old English dun meaning hill. The surname simply referred to the hill with a flat top. [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)


Early Origins of the Shelldyn family


The surname Shelldyn was first found in Worcestershire where "John Sheldon, of Abberton, in the reign of Henry IV" [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Shirley, Evelyn Philip, The Noble and Gentle Men of England; The Arms and Descents. Westminster: John Bower Nichols and Sons, 1866, Print.
is generally believed to be the progenitor. However, the Warwickshire "ancient house of Sheldon, of Sheldon is a matter of doubt, but not improbable. [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Shirley, Evelyn Philip, The Noble and Gentle Men of England; The Arms and Descents. Westminster: John Bower Nichols and Sons, 1866, Print.
For it is in Warwickshire that the family rose in prominence when William Sheldon purchased the manor of Beoly from Richard Neville in the reign of Edward IV. [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Shirley, Evelyn Philip, The Noble and Gentle Men of England; The Arms and Descents. Westminster: John Bower Nichols and Sons, 1866, Print.
The family held this estate as their principal seat until it was destroyed by a fire in the Civil Wars of the 17th century. "[Beoley, Worcestershire] belonged successively to the noble families of Mortimer, Beauchamp, and Holland, of whose ancient castle the mound and moat still remain; and in the reign of Charles I. the manor was the property of Ralph Sheldon, a distinguished royalist, whose mansion was burned by the family themselves, to prevent its falling into the possession of the parliamentarians. Attached to the church is the chapel of 'Our Lady,' formerly a private chapel of the Sheldon family, to whom it has a very handsome monument: underneath the chapel is the vault." [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
Over in the parish of Temple Grafton, another branch of the family was found. Originally held by Knights Templar (hence the prefix "Temple"), the property was purchased by the Sheldon family in the Dissolution of the Monasteries between 1536 and 1541 by Henry VIII. [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

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Early History of the Shelldyn family

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Early History of the Shelldyn family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Shelldyn research.
Another 141 words (10 lines of text) covering the years 1584, 1654, 1599, 1687, 1598, 1677, 1660 and 1663 are included under the topic Early Shelldyn History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Shelldyn Spelling Variations

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Shelldyn Spelling Variations


Sound was what guided spelling in the essentially pre-literate Middle Ages, so one person's name was often recorded under several variations during a single lifetime. Also, before the advent of the printing press and the first dictionaries, the English language was not standardized. Therefore, spelling variations were common, even among the names of the most literate people. Known variations of the Shelldyn family name include Sheldon, Shelden, Seldin, Sheldyn, Sheltan and others.

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Early Notables of the Shelldyn family (pre 1700)

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Early Notables of the Shelldyn family (pre 1700)


Another 50 words (4 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Shelldyn Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Migration of the Shelldyn family to Ireland

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Migration of the Shelldyn family to Ireland


Some of the Shelldyn family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 57 words (4 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Migration of the Shelldyn family to the New World and Oceana

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Migration of the Shelldyn family to the New World and Oceana


For political, religious, and economic reasons, thousands of English families boarded ships for Ireland, the Canadas, the America colonies, and many of smaller tropical colonies in the hope of finding better lives abroad. Although the passage on the cramped, dank ships caused many to arrive in the New World diseased and starving, those families that survived the trip often went on to make valuable contributions to those new societies to which they arrived. Early immigrants bearing the Shelldyn surname or a spelling variation of the name include : Isaac Sheldon, who settled in New England in 1630; Pardon Sheldon settled in Boston in 1767; Godfrey Sheldon settled in Maine in 1630; Elizabeth Sheldrick settled in Virginia in 1732.

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The Shelldyn Motto

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The Shelldyn Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Optimum pati
Motto Translation: To suffer is best.


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Shelldyn Family Crest Products

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Shelldyn Family Crest Products



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See Also

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See Also



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Citations

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Citations


  1. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
  2. ^ Shirley, Evelyn Philip, The Noble and Gentle Men of England; The Arms and Descents. Westminster: John Bower Nichols and Sons, 1866, Print.
  3. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

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