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Peckworthy History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



The name Peckworthy first arose amongst the Anglo-Saxon tribes of Britain. It is derived from their having lived at Beckwith in the Yorkshire parish of Pannal, and it is from this location that the name Peckworthy is derived. The distinguished name Peckworthy is derived from the Old English word bece, which means beech, and the Old Norse word vior, which means wood. Thus the surname Peckworthy indicates the proximity of the town to a grove of beech trees. [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Hanks, Patricia and Flavia Hodges, A Dictionary of Surnames. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988. Print. (ISBN 0-19-211592-8)
The name of Beckwith is said to have been changed from Malbie in the 12th century. [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.


Early Origins of the Peckworthy family


The surname Peckworthy was first found in Yorkshire, where "most of the armigerous families of the name spring from, and Beckwith, a hamlet in the parish of Pannal, in that county, is probably the cradle of the race. " [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.

Early History of the Peckworthy family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Peckworthy research.
Another 115 words (8 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Peckworthy History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Peckworthy Spelling Variations


One relatively recent invention that did much to standardize English spelling was the printing press. However, before its invention even the most literate people recorded their names according to sound rather than spelling. The spelling variations under which the name Peckworthy has appeared include Beckwith, Beckworth, Beckworthe and others.

Early Notables of the Peckworthy family (pre 1700)


More information is included under the topic Early Peckworthy Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Peckworthy family to the New World and Oceana


At this time, the shores of the New World beckoned many English families that felt that the social climate in England was oppressive and lacked opportunity for change. Thousands left England at great expense in ships that were overcrowded and full of disease. A great portion of these settlers never survived the journey and even a greater number arrived sick, starving, and without a penny. The survivors, however, were often greeted with greater opportunity than they could have experienced back home. These English settlers made significant contributions to those colonies that would eventually become the United States and Canada. An examination of early immigration records and passenger ship lists revealed that people bearing the name Peckworthy arrived in North America very early: Sir Marmaduke Beckwith of Aldborough who settled in Richmond County, Virginia in 1748; but he had been preceded by Matthew Beckwith who settled in Connecticut in 1635.

The Peckworthy Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Jouir en bien
Motto Translation: To enjoy innocent


Peckworthy Family Crest Products



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Citations


  1. ^ Hanks, Patricia and Flavia Hodges, A Dictionary of Surnames. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988. Print. (ISBN 0-19-211592-8)
  2. ^ Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.

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