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Peartoomb History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



The ancestors of the Peartoomb family arrived in England following the Norman Conquest of 1066. The name Peartoomb came from the Norman given name Partant.

Early Origins of the Peartoomb family


The surname Peartoomb was first found in Cumberland at Parton, a township, in the parish of Moresby, union of Whitehaven, Allerdale ward above Derwent. [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
Now part of Cumbria, this seaside village sometimes called Parton Bay was used by the Romans, who had a fort on north of the present village. Parton is also found in Kirkcudbrightshire Scotland, and in Gloucestershire but it is generally believed that the aforementioned village and parish has the strongest evidence of the family heritage. But early records have the name scattered throughout Britain: Adam of Peron in the Assize Rolls of Wiltshire in 1249; Robert Perton in 1249; and John Parton in the the Assize Rolls of Warwickshire in 1377. [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
Moving north to Scotland, early records there revealed Patrick fiz Matheu de Partone of Dumfries rendering homage to King Edward I of England in 1296. [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)

Early History of the Peartoomb family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Peartoomb research.
Another 231 words (16 lines of text) covering the years 1070 and 1296 are included under the topic Early Peartoomb History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Peartoomb Spelling Variations


It is only in the last few hundred years that the English language has been standardized. For that reason, Anglo-Norman surnames like Peartoomb are characterized by many spelling variations. Scribes and monks in the Middle Ages spelled names they sounded, so it is common to find several variations that refer to a single person. As the English language changed and incorporated elements of other European languages such as Norman French and Latin, even literate people regularly changed the spelling of their names. The variations of the name Peartoomb include Parton, Partin, Partone, Partant, Pardon, Pardant and others.

Early Notables of the Peartoomb family (pre 1700)


More information is included under the topic Early Peartoomb Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Peartoomb family to the New World and Oceana


Faced with the chaos present in England at that time, many English families looked towards the open frontiers of the New World with its opportunities to escape oppression and starvation. People migrated to North America, as well as Australia and Ireland in droves, paying exorbitant rates for passages in cramped, unsafe ships. Many of the settlers did not make the long passage alive, but those who did see the shores of North America were welcomed with great opportunity. Many of the families that came from England went on to make essential contributions to the emerging nations of Canada and the United States. Some of the first immigrants to cross the Atlantic and come to North America carried the name Peartoomb, or a variant listed above: Robert Partin who settled in Virginia in 1609; eleven years before the "Mayflower"; Robert and Margaret Partin settled in Virginia with their three children in 1624.

Peartoomb Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  2. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  3. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)

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