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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2017


The vast movement of people that followed the Norman Conquest of England in 1066 brought the Partrech family name to the British Isles. Partrech comes from the given name Patrick. It was largely as a result of the fame of the 5th century Romano British saint of this name that Patrick was such a popular given name in the Middle Ages. It derives from the Latin Patricus, meaning the son of a noble father, a member of the patrician class, and a member of the Roman hereditary aristocracy.

They claim descent from Patrick de la Lande who was from La Lande near Caen in Normandy. "William Patrick de la Lande is mentioned by Wace as the entertainer of Harold during his visit to Normandy, and as challenging him to combat at Hastings for breach of his oath." [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)

To better understand this quotation, the reader needs to know that Wace (c. 1110-1174) was a Norman poet, born in Jersey. His "Roman de Brut," was a verse history of Britain, based on the Historia Regum Britanniae by Geoffrey of Monmouth. In many ways, Wace's works often referred to as Wace's poems, are the only accurate history of those times.

Partrech Early Origins



The surname Partrech was first found in Norfolk and Suffolk where King William granted a barony of fifteen fees shortly after the Norman Conquest to the aforementioned William Patrick. "William, his son, witnessed a charter of William I., to Savigny Abbey." [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)

Within one hundred years of the Conquest, branches of the family were found in northern England including the mention of Paganus de la Lande who held three fees in 1165 from the see of York.


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Partrech Spelling Variations


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Partrech Spelling Variations



Multitudes of spelling variations are a hallmark of Anglo Norman names. Most of these names evolved in the 11th and 12th century, in the time after the Normans introduced their own Norman French language into a country where Old and Middle English had no spelling rules and the languages of the court were French and Latin. To make matters worse, medieval scribes spelled words according to sound, so names frequently appeared differently in the various documents in which they were recorded. The name was spelled Patrick, Patryck, Partick and others.

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Partrech Early History


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Partrech Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Partrech research. Another 289 words (21 lines of text) covering the years 1160, 1201, 1211, 1626, 1707, 1679 and 1689 are included under the topic Early Partrech History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Partrech Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Partrech Early Notables (pre 1700)



Another 25 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Partrech Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Partrech In Ireland


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Partrech In Ireland



Some of the Partrech family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. Another 82 words (6 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



Because of this political and religious unrest within English society, many people decided to immigrate to the colonies. Families left for Ireland, North America, and Australia in enormous numbers, traveling at high cost in extremely inhospitable conditions. The New World in particular was a desirable destination, but the long voyage caused many to arrive sick and starving. Those who made it, though, were welcomed by opportunities far greater than they had known at home in England. Many of these families went on to make important contributions to the emerging nations of Canada and the United States. Analysis of immigration records indicates that some of the first North American immigrants bore the name Partrech or a variant listed above: Henry Patrick who settled in Virginia in 1638; Leo Patrick settled in Virginia in 1646; Daniel Patrick and his wife settled in Salem Massachusetts in 1630.

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Motto


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Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Ora et labora
Motto Translation: Pray and work.


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Partrech Family Crest Products


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Partrech Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



  1. ^ The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)

Other References

  1. Zieber, Eugene. Heraldry in America. Philadelphia: Genealogical Publishing Co. Print.
  2. Crozier, William Armstrong Edition. Crozier's General Armory A Registry of American Families Entitled to Coat Armor. New York: Fox, Duffield, 1904. Print.
  3. Samuelsen, W. David. New York City Passenger List Manifests Index 1820 - 1824. North Salt Lake, Utah: Accelerated Indexing Systems International, 1986. Print.
  4. Elster, Robert J. International Who's Who. London: Europa/Routledge. Print.
  5. Marcharn, Frederick George. A Constitutional History of Modern England 1485 to the Present. London: Harper and Brothers, 1960. Print.
  6. Le Patourel, John. The Norman Empire. New York: Oxford University Press, 1976. Print. (ISBN 0-19-822525-3).
  7. Markale, J. Celtic Civilization. London: Gordon & Cremonesi, 1976. Print.
  8. Dunkling, Leslie. Dictionary of Surnames. Toronto: Collins, 1998. Print. (ISBN 0004720598).
  9. Thirsk, Joan. The Agrarian History of England and Wales. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press: 7 Volumes. Print.
  10. Bradford, William. History of Plymouth Plantation 1620-1647 Edited by Samuel Eliot Morrison 2 Volumes. New York: Russell and Russell, 1968. Print.
  11. ...

The Partrech Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Partrech Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 7 September 2017 at 07:40.

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