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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright © 2000 - 2016


The distinguished surname Pangbyrn is of ancient English origin. It is derived from "Pangbourne," the name of a town in the county of Berkshire, and is thought to mean "Paega's stream."

Pangbyrn Early Origins



The surname Pangbyrn was first found in the county of Berkshire, where the family held a family seat from ancient times. It is likely that the progenitor of the name was a native of Pangbourne, in the hundred of Reading, a large village and civil parish on the River Thames. The parish takes its name from a trout stream called the Pang, which runs through it. In October, 1838, excavators for the railway, at Shooter's Hill, found five human skeletons, of Roman vintage including spearheads, spurs, and battle-axes of British and Roman manufacture, urns of terra cotta, and a large quantity of coins of various Roman emperors.

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Pangbyrn Spelling Variations


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Pangbyrn Spelling Variations



Only recently has spelling become standardized in the English language. As the English language evolved in the Middle Ages, the spelling of names changed also. The name Pangbyrn has undergone many spelling variations, including Pangborn, Pangburn, Pangbourne, Pangborne, Pangburne, Pangeburn and many more.

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Pangbyrn Early History


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Pangbyrn Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Pangbyrn research. Another 161 words (12 lines of text) covering the years 1185, 1273 and 1640 are included under the topic Early Pangbyrn History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Pangbyrn Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Pangbyrn Early Notables (pre 1700)



Another 21 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Pangbyrn Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



To escape the unstable social climate in England of this time, many families boarded ships for the New World with the hope of finding land, opportunity, and greater religious and political freedom. Although the voyages were expensive, crowded, and difficult, those families that arrived often found greater opportunities and freedoms than they could have experienced at home. Many of those families went on to make significant contributions to the rapidly developing colonies in which they settled. Early North American records indicate many people bearing the name Pangbyrn were among those contributors: Peter Pangburn, who emigrated from Oxfordshire to Essex County, New Jersey during the mid-17th century, Jesse Pangburn, who was recorded in Québec in 1795.

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Motto


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Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Malo mori quam foedari
Motto Translation: I would rather die than be disgraced.


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Pangbyrn Family Crest Products


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Pangbyrn Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



    Other References

    1. Filby, P. William and Mary K Meyer. Passenger and Immigration Lists Index in Four Volumes. Detroit: Gale Research, 1985. Print. (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8).
    2. Egle, William Henry. Pennsylvania Genealogies Scotch-Irish and German. Harrisburg: L.S. Hart, 1886. Print.
    3. Hinde, Thomas Ed. The Domesday Book England's Heritage Then and Now. Surrey: Colour Library Books, 1995. Print. (ISBN 1-85833-440-3).
    4. Foster, Joseph. Dictionary of Heraldry Feudal Coats of Arms and Pedigrees. London: Bracken Books, 1989. Print. (ISBN 1-85170-309-8).
    5. Markale, J. Celtic Civilization. London: Gordon & Cremonesi, 1976. Print.
    6. Bowman, George Ernest. The Mayflower Reader A Selection of Articales from The Mayflower Descendent. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
    7. Ingram, Rev. James. Translator Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 1823. Print.
    8. Matthews, John. Matthews' American Armoury and Blue Book. London: John Matthews, 1911. Print.
    9. Skordas, Guest. Ed. The Early Settlers of Maryland an Index to Names or Immigrants Complied from Records of Land Patents 1633-1680 in the Hall of Records Annapolis, Maryland. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1968. Print.
    10. Innes, Thomas and Learney. The Tartans of the Clans and Families of Scotland 1st Edition. Edinburgh: W & A. K. Johnston Limited, 1938. Print.
    11. ...

    The Pangbyrn Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Pangbyrn Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

    This page was last modified on 7 July 2014 at 11:22.

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