O'Gromynd History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Many variations of the name O'Gromynd have evolved since the time of its initial creation. In Gaelic it appeared as Mac Gormain, derived from the word "gorm," which means "blue."

Early Origins of the O'Gromynd family

The surname O'Gromynd was first found in County Clare, where O'Gorman was chief of Tullichrin, a territory comprising parts of the baronies of Moyarta and Ibrackan. They claim descendancy through the O'Connor pedigree, specifically through Daire, a younger brother of Ros Failgeach. He was the second son of Mor, the King of Leinster and the 109th Monarch of Ireland. The family were the Chiefs of Ibrckan in County Claire. [1] The Mac (Mc) prefix is rarely found today due to the fact that in the early nineteenth century native Irish "were in complete subjection." [2]

Important Dates for the O'Gromynd family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our O'Gromynd research. Another 90 words (6 lines of text) covering the years 117 and 1172 are included under the topic Early O'Gromynd History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

O'Gromynd Spelling Variations

Those scribes in Ireland during the Middle Ages recorded names as they sounded. Consequently, in this era many people were recorded under different spellings each time their name was written down. Research on the O'Gromynd family name revealed numerous spelling variations, including Gorman, MacGorman, O'Gorman and others.

Early Notables of the O'Gromynd family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early O'Gromynd Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the O'Gromynd family

During the 19th century thousands of impoverished Irish families made the long journey to British North America and the United States. These people were leaving a land that had become beset with poverty, lack of opportunity, and hunger. In North America, they hoped to find land, work, and political and religious freedoms. Although the majority of the immigrants that survived the long sea passage did make these discoveries, it was not without much perseverance and hard work: by the mid-19th century land suitable for agriculture was short supply, especially in British North America, in the east; the work available was generally low paying and physically taxing construction or factory work; and the English stereotypes concerning the Irish, although less frequent and vehement, were, nevertheless, present in the land of freedom, liberty, and equality for all men. The largest influx of Irish settlers occurred with Great Potato Famine during the late 1840s. Research into passenger and immigration lists has brought forth evidence of the early members of the O'Gromynd family in North America: William Gorman who settled in New England in 1747; another William settled in Boston in 1804; Bernard, Edward, Hugh, James, John, Michael, Owen, Patrick, Samuel, Thomas and William Gorman, all arrived in Philadelphia between 1830 and 1865..

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Citations

  1. ^ O'Hart, John, Irish Pedigrees 5th Edition in 2 Volumes. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1976. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0737-4)
  2. ^ MacLysaght, Edward, Irish Families Their Names, Arms and Origins 4th Edition. Dublin: Irish Academic, 1982. Print. (ISBN 0-7165-2364-7)
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