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Moldworthe History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



The name Moldworthe arrived in England after the Norman Conquest of 1066. The Moldworthe family lived in a place named Molesworth in Cambridgeshire or a place named Mouldsworth in Cheshire. The place-name Molesworth is derived from the Old English word Mulesword, which is composed of the elements mul, which means mule, and word, which means enclosure. The place-name Mouldsworth is derived from the Old English words molda, which means the crown of the head or top of the hill, and word, which again means enclosure. [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)


Early Origins of the Moldworthe family


The surname Moldworthe was first found in Huntingdon where they held a family seat as Lords of the Manor of Molesworth in that shire. Conjecturally they are descended from Eustace the Sheriff of Huntingdon who held his lands at the time of the taking of the Domesday Book from Countess Judith, a relation of Duke William of Normandy. "Sir Walter de Molesworth was one of Edward the 1st's Crusaders." [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
Some of the family were found at Tetcott in Devon since early times. "Tetcott House, the beautiful seat of Sir William Molesworth, Bart., was destroyed by fire in May, 1841." [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

Early History of the Moldworthe family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Moldworthe research.
Another 111 words (8 lines of text) covering the years 1124, 1638, 1689, 1656, 1725, 1680 and 1758 are included under the topic Early Moldworthe History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Moldworthe Spelling Variations


Anglo-Norman names tend to be marked by an enormous number of spelling variations. This is largely due to the fact that Old and Middle English lacked any spelling rules when Norman French was introduced in the 11th century. The languages of the English courts at that time were French and Latin. These various languages mixed quite freely in the evolving social milieu. The final element of this mix is that medieval scribes spelled words according to their sounds rather than any definite rules, so a name was often spelled in as many different ways as the number of documents it appeared in. The name was spelled Molesworth, Molesworthy, Mollsworth, Molsworth, Molswurth, Mollswurth, Mollswirth, Moleswirth, Mullsworth, Moldworth, Moldsworth and many more.

Early Notables of the Moldworthe family (pre 1700)


Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Sir Hender Molesworth (1638-1689), 1st Baronet Molesworth of Pencarrow, Governor of Jamaica; Robert Molesworth (1656-1725), 1st Viscount Molesworth, British statesman, English and Irish landowner, Ambassador to Denmark, Ambassador to Sweden...
Another 38 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Moldworthe Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Moldworthe family to the New World and Oceana


Because of the political and religious discontent in England, families began to migrate abroad in enormous numbers. Faced with persecution and starvation at home, the open frontiers and generally less oppressive social environment of the New World seemed tantalizing indeed to many English people. The trip was difficult, and not all made it unscathed, but many of those who did get to Canada and the United States made important contributions to the young nations in which they settled. Some of the first North American settlers with Moldworthe name or one of its variants: Captain Moldsworth who settled in Boston Massachusetts in 1766; and members of the family who settled at Spring Garden in Jamaica and became known as Colonial Gentry..

The Moldworthe Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Vincit amor patriae
Motto Translation: My beloved country will conquer.


Moldworthe Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
  2. ^ Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  3. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.


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