McGranell History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

McGranell is one of the thousands of new names that the Norman Conquest of 1066 brought to England. It comes from the Norman given name Reginald or Regenweald, meaning brave councilor, which is an alteration of the Old French name Reinold. "Several tenants in chief in Domesday [Book] are called Rainaldus. Reynell, Reynard, Reynardson, Rennal." [1]

"Its area of distribution is confined, for the most part, to the central part of England extending to the eastern counties between the Wash and the Thames. It is rare or absent in the south coast counties, excluding Cornwall, and excepting a scanty representation in Lancashire it does not occur north of a line drawn from the Humber to the Mersey. Shropshire, Norfolk, Wilts, and Cornwall are its principal homes." [2]

Early Origins of the McGranell family

The surname McGranell was first found in Somerset where they were granted lands by William the Conqueror after the Norman Conquest of England in 1066. Early records of the name mention Willemus filius Raunaldi who was listed in the Domesday Book of 1086. Walter Reynolds (died 1327) was Bishop of Worcester, Archbishop of Canterbury (1313-1327), Lord High Treasurer and Lord Chancellor. [3]

"The manor of Trebartha [in Cornwall] is said to have belonged to Walter Reynell, a knight of Gascony, so early as the reign of Richard I. at which time he was Castellan of Launceston." [4]

The Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 listed John Reynold, Cambridgeshire; Roger filius Reynald, Oxfordshire; and William filius Reynaud, Cambridgeshire. And the Yorkshire Poll Tax Rolls of 1379 listed Rainaldus filius Willelmi; and Ricardus Raynoldson. [5]

Early History of the McGranell family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our McGranell research. Another 137 words (10 lines of text) covering the years 1191, 1191, 1194, 1198, 1327, 1313, 1327, 1588, 1655, 1549, 1607, 1544, 1594, 1599, 1676, 1589, 1655, 1624, 1625, 1657, 1655, 1657, 1636, 1690, 1657, 1612 and 1663 are included under the topic Early McGranell History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

McGranell Spelling Variations

Before the advent of the printing press and the first dictionaries, the English language was not standardized. Sound was what guided spelling in the Middle Ages, so one person's name was often recorded under several variations during a single lifetime. Spelling variations were common, even among the names of the most literate people. Known variations of the McGranell family name include Reynell, Reynolds, Reynold, Reynalds, Reynell, Renaud, Renaut, Renouf, Rennard, Renals, Rennell, Rennels and many more.

Early Notables of the McGranell family (pre 1700)

Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Walter Reynolds (d. 1327) the son of a Windsor baker, who became a favorite of King Edward II, Archbishop of Canterbury (1313-1327); John Reynolds (c. 1588-c. 1655), an English merchant and writer from Exeter, produced a series of violent stories around marriage, adultery and murder as well as some political writings that caused him to be imprisoned. John Reynolds or Rainolds (1549-1607), was English president of Corpus Christi College, Oxford, and dean of Lincoln, born at Pinhoe, near Exeter. William Reinolds (c. 1544-1594), was an English Roman Catholic divine, second son of Richard Rainolds...
Another 152 words (11 lines of text) are included under the topic Early McGranell Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the McGranell family to Ireland

Some of the McGranell family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 59 words (4 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the McGranell family

To escape the political and religious chaos of this era, thousands of English families began to migrate to the New World in search of land and freedom from religious and political persecution. The passage was expensive and the ships were dark, crowded, and unsafe; however, those who made the voyage safely were encountered opportunities that were not available to them in their homeland. Many of the families that reached the New World at this time went on to make important contributions to the emerging nations of the United States and Canada. Research into various historical records has revealed some of first members of the McGranell family to immigrate North America: Henry, Samuel, Thomas Reynold settled in Barbados in 1688; Christopher Reynolds settled in Virginia in 1622; Nathaniel Reynold settled in Salem in 1630.



The McGranell Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Jus meum tuebor
Motto Translation: I will defend my right.


  1. ^ Lower, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  2. ^ Guppy, Henry Brougham, Homes of Family Names in Great Britain. 1890. Print.
  3. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  4. ^ Hutchins, Fortescue, The History of Cornwall, from the Earliest Records and Traditions to the Present Time. London: William Penaluna, 1824. Print
  5. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)


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