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McAnabb History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



The first family to use the name McAnabb lived in the area that was once the ancient Scottish kingdom of Dalriada. It is a name for a son of an abbot. The Gaelic form of the name is Mac an Aba. They are descended from the hereditary abbots of St. Fillan's near Loch Earn. Fillan was a royal prince of the royal house of Dalriada. In the reign of William, the Lyon of Scotland, the Abbots of Glendochart held a rank equivalent to the Earls of Atholl and Menteith. The Clan held the barony of Glendochart at the west end of Loch Tay.

Early Origins of the McAnabb family


The surname McAnabb was first found in Perthshire (Gaelic: Siorrachd Pheairt) former county in the present day Council Area of Perth and Kinross, located in central Scotland, where they joined with the MacDougalls in opposing Robert the Bruce and consequently lost many of the vast territories they had held. However, the Chief of the MacNabs finally became reconciled to the Bruce, and regained many of his lost lands when King David II came to the throne of Scotland. He also received the official charter for the barony of Bowaine dated 1336. Finlay MacNab, the 4th Chief of the Clan, added considerably to the estates toward the end of the 15th century, but in 1552 another Finlay, the 6th Chief, fell into financial difficulties and mortgaged most of the Clan lands to the Campbell of Glenorchy. The Clan, however, refused to acknowledge the superiority of the Campbells

Early History of the McAnabb family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our McAnabb research.
Another 488 words (35 lines of text) covering the years 1612, 1651, 1660, 1745, 1780, 1816, 1820, 1770, 1860, 1798, 1862, 1854, 1856 and are included under the topic Early McAnabb History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

McAnabb Spelling Variations


Translation in medieval times was an undeveloped science and was often carried out without due care. For this reason, many early Scottish names appeared radically altered when written in English. The spelling variations of McAnabb include MacNab, MacNabb, MacKnab, Mac an Aba (Gaelic) and others.

Early Notables of the McAnabb family (pre 1700)


Another 25 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early McAnabb Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the McAnabb family to Ireland


Some of the McAnabb family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 99 words (7 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the McAnabb family to the New World and Oceana


Many settled along the east coast of what would become the United States and Canada. As the American War of Independence broke out, those who remained loyal to the crown went north to Canada as United Empire Loyalists. The ancestors of all of these hardy Dalriadan-Scottish settlers began to recover their collective history in the 20th century with the advent of the vibrant culture fostered by highland games and Clan societies in North America. Highland games, clan societies, and other organizations generated much renewed interest in Scottish heritage in the 20th century. The McAnabb were among the earliest of the Scottish settlers as immigration passenger lists have shown: Alexander, Thomas and John MacNabb settled in Jamaica in 1716; Daniel, John, Patrick and Samuel McNabb all arrived in Philadelphia between 1840 and 1860..

The McAnabb Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Timor omnis abesto
Motto Translation: Let fear be far from all.


McAnabb Family Crest Products



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