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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2017


Manvil is a name of ancient Norman origin. It arrived in England with the Norman Conquest of 1066. The Manvil family lived in Mandeville, near Valognes, Cotentin, Normandy. In Mandeville, the Norman Manvil family were nobles who possessed a castle and vast estates. The family name Manvil was brought to England after the Norman Conquest, when William the Conqueror gave his friends and relatives most of the land formerly owned by Anglo-Saxon aristocrats. Frequently, the Normans, such as the Manvil family, identified themselves by reference to the estates from which they came from in Northern France.

Manvil Early Origins



The surname Manvil was first found in Wiltshire where they were anciently granted lands by William Duke of Normandy for their assistance at the Battle of Hastings in 1066 A.D. Geoffrey de Mandeville (c.1100) was an important Domesday tenant-in-chief; he was granted large estates in Essex, and in ten other shires by William, and was Constable of the Tower of London.

They were granted no less than 118 Lordships after the Conquest. William's descendent Geoffrey de Mandeville (d. 1144,) was created the 1st Earl of Essex, a title which became extinct in the 12th century after the death of the 3rd Earl.

The chief seat of the Mandevilles was at Walden in Essex, but many junior lines abounded. "Jehan de Mandeville", translated as "Sir John Mandeville", was noted as the compiler of a singular book of supposed travels, written in Anglo-Norman French, published between 1357 and 1371. They were Lords of the Manor of Earl's Stoke, in Wiltshire and also were granted lands in Devon.


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Manvil Spelling Variations


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Manvil Spelling Variations



It is only in the last few hundred years that the English language has been standardized. For that reason, Anglo-Norman surnames like Manvil are characterized by many spelling variations. Scribes and monks in the Middle Ages spelled names they sounded, so it is common to find several variations that refer to a single person. As the English language changed and incorporated elements of other European languages such as Norman French and Latin, even literate people regularly changed the spelling of their names. The variations of the name Manvil include Mansville, Manvell, Mandeville, Magneville, Magnevilla, Manville, Mannevill, Manneville, Mandevile, Mansvile, Mansville, Mandevill, Manvill, Mansvill, Mansvil, Mandevil, Mandervil, Mandervill, Manderville, Mandavile, Mandavil, Mandavill, Mandaville, Mandavall, Mandavalle, Mandaval, Mandvill, Mandville, Mandvil and many more.

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Manvil Early History


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Manvil Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Manvil research. Another 205 words (15 lines of text) covering the years 1357, 1357, 1371, 1189, 1670 and 1733 are included under the topic Early Manvil History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Manvil Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Manvil Early Notables (pre 1700)



Outstanding amongst the family at this time was "Jehan de Mandeville", better known as "Sir John Mandeville", ( fl. 1357), English knight born at St. Albans, who complied "The Travels of Sir John Mandeville," a book account of his supposed travels throughout Europe published between 1357 and 1371; William de Mandeville (d...

Another 57 words (4 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Manvil Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Manvil In Ireland


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Manvil In Ireland



Some of the Manvil family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. Another 105 words (8 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



Faced with the chaos present in England at that time, many English families looked towards the open frontiers of the New World with its opportunities to escape oppression and starvation. People migrated to North America, as well as Australia and Ireland in droves, paying exorbitant rates for passages in cramped, unsafe ships. Many of the settlers did not make the long passage alive, but those who did see the shores of North America were welcomed with great opportunity. Many of the families that came from England went on to make essential contributions to the emerging nations of Canada and the United States. Some of the first immigrants to cross the Atlantic and come to North America carried the name Manvil, or a variant listed above: Gillis Mandeville, who settled in New York in 1659; Miss Mandeville settled in Barbados in 1774; Mary Mandeville settled in Maryland in 1738. In Newfoundland, Canada, Patrick Mandavile from Clonmell, Tipperary, was married in St. John's in 1805.

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Manvil Family Crest Products


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Manvil Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



    Other References

    1. Hinde, Thomas Ed. The Domesday Book England's Heritage Then and Now. Surrey: Colour Library Books, 1995. Print. (ISBN 1-85833-440-3).
    2. Weis, Frederick Lewis, Walter Lee Sheppard and David Faris. Ancestral Roots of Sixty Colonists Who Came to New England Between 1623 and 1650 7th Edition. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0806313676).
    3. Skordas, Guest. Ed. The Early Settlers of Maryland an Index to Names or Immigrants Complied from Records of Land Patents 1633-1680 in the Hall of Records Annapolis, Maryland. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1968. Print.
    4. Lennard, Reginald. Rural England 1086-1135 A Study of Social and Agrarian Conditions. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1959. Print.
    5. Leeson, Francis L. Dictionary of British Peerages. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1986. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-1121-5).
    6. Thirsk, Joan. The Agrarian History of England and Wales. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press: 7 Volumes. Print.
    7. Marcharn, Frederick George. A Constitutional History of Modern England 1485 to the Present. London: Harper and Brothers, 1960. Print.
    8. Innes, Thomas and Learney. The Tartans of the Clans and Families of Scotland 1st Edition. Edinburgh: W & A. K. Johnston Limited, 1938. Print.
    9. Cook, Chris. English Historical Facts 1603-1688. London: MacMillan, 1980. Print.
    10. Matthews, John. Matthews' American Armoury and Blue Book. London: John Matthews, 1911. Print.
    11. ...

    The Manvil Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Manvil Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

    This page was last modified on 26 August 2016 at 11:11.

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