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langthurn History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



The present generation of the langthurn family is only the most recent to bear a name that dates back to the ancient Anglo-Saxon culture of Britain. Their name comes from having lived in Lincolnshire. However, there are numerous villages and civil parishes named "Langton" throughout England including locals in Leicestershire, North Yorkshire, Cumbria, Durham, Kent and Dorset. This is large part due to the fact that the place name literally translates as "long farmstead or estate," having derived from the Old English words "lang" + "tun." [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
Some are listed in the Domesday Book of 1086: Lang(e)tone (Leicestershire); Langeton (North Yorkshire - now Great Langton); and Terlintone (Leicetershire - now Tur Langton.) [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
The oldest place name recorded was Langton Durham which was listed as Langadum c. 1050 eluding to it's Saxon origin.


Early Origins of the langthurn family


The surname langthurn was first found in Lincolnshire at Langton by Spilsby, sometimes called Langton by Partney, a village and civil parish in the East Lindsey district. The parish of Langton is nearby. "This parish, which has been the residence of the Langton family for more than seven centuries." [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
One of the earliest records of the name was Cardinal Stephen Langton (c.1150-1228), who was Archbishop of Canterbury (1207 until death in 1228.) He was a critical player in the dispute between King John of England and Pope Innocent III, which ultimately led to the issuing of Magna Carta in 1215. A manor which has remained to the present day in the inheritance of this house can be found at Langton by Spilsby. [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
Shirley, Evelyn Philip, The Noble and Gentle Men of England; The Arms and Descents. Westminster: John Bower Nichols and Sons, 1866, Print.
Walter de Langton (1296-1321), Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield, Lord High Treasurer of England, and a favourite of Edward I. was born in Langton West.

Another branch of the family was found at Woolstone in Lancashire. "In the 20th of Edward I., John Byrun claimed free warren here in right of his wife Alesia, heiress of Robert Banastre. This lady was afterwards married to Sir John Langton, whose descendant, John Langton, in the reign of Edward III. held Wolueston as Baron of Makerfield. How long the property continued in this family does not appear, but it seems to have been alienated anterior to the reign of Philip and Mary." [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.


Early History of the langthurn family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our langthurn research.
Another 89 words (6 lines of text) covering the years 1150, 1228, 1207, 1228, 1215, 1279, 1248, 1227, 1248, 1337, 1305, 1337, 1501, 1659, 1645, 1648, 1614, 1622, 1625, 1626, 1698 and 1788 are included under the topic Early langthurn History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

langthurn Spelling Variations


Until the dictionary, an invention of only the last few hundred years, the English language lacked any comprehensive system of spelling rules. Consequently, spelling variations in names are frequently found in early Anglo-Saxon and later Anglo-Norman documents. One person's name was often spelled several different ways over a lifetime. The recorded variations of langthurn include Langton, Langston and others.

Early Notables of the langthurn family (pre 1700)


Distinguished members of the family include Stephen Langton (c. 1150-1228), Archbishop of Canterbury (1207-1228), a central figure in the dispute between King John of England and Pope Innocent III, which contributed to the crisis which led to the issuing of Magna Carta in 1215; William Langton (or William of Rotherfield; died...
Another 96 words (7 lines of text) are included under the topic Early langthurn Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the langthurn family to Ireland


Some of the langthurn family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. More information about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the langthurn family to the New World and Oceana


Thousands of English families boarded ships sailing to the New World in the hope of escaping the unrest found in England at this time. Although the search for opportunity and freedom from persecution abroad took the lives of many because of the cramped conditions and unsanitary nature of the vessels, the opportunity perceived in the growing colonies of North America beckoned. Many of the settlers who survived the journey went on to make important contributions to the transplanted cultures of their adopted countries. The langthurn were among these contributors, for they have been located in early North American records: Stephen Langton settled in Barbados with his wife and servants in 1680; Thomas and Rebecca Langton settled in Virginia in 1679; Thomas Langton arrived in New York in 1822..

The langthurn Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Loyal au mort
Motto Translation: Faithful unto death.


langthurn Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
  2. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  3. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  4. ^ Shirley, Evelyn Philip, The Noble and Gentle Men of England; The Arms and Descents. Westminster: John Bower Nichols and Sons, 1866, Print.


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