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Kingsberray History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



The ancient roots of the Kingsberray family name are in the Anglo-Saxon culture. The name Kingsberray comes from when the family lived in one of the various parishes called Kingsberry (Kingbury), which had locations in the counties of Middlesex, Warwickshire, and Somerset. Literally the surname means "the King's Castle [Old English Cynges-burh, burh, a stronghold, &c.]" [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Harrison, Henry, Surnames of the United Kingdom: A Concise Etymological Dictionary Baltimore: Geneological Publishing Company, 2013. Print
Other sources claim the name literally means "the King's Manor" or "the King's Fort." [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Smith, Eldson Coles, New Dictionary of American Family Names New York, Harper & Row, 1956. Print
[3]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.

As noted, the place names were Anglo Saxon in origin and as such, predates the Norman Conquest. The Middlesex (London) parish dates back to 1044, when it was known as Kynges Byrig, but a few years later was listed as Chingesberie in the Domesday Book of 1086. The Somerset has the same spelling in the Domesday Book, but was listed as Cyncgesbyrig in 1065. [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
As one would presume, the Somerset spelling in 1065 likely influenced the spelling for the Middlesex parish in the Domesday Book.

Early Origins of the Kingsberray family


The surname Kingsberray was first found in Hertfordshire where John de Kingesberi was listed in the Curia Regis Rolls of 1211. A few years later, William de Kynnesbir was listed in the Assize Rolls of Warwickshire in 1221. [5]CITATION[CLOSE]
Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
And in the Hundredorum Rolls of 1273, Adam de Kinggesbire was listed as holding lands at that time in Lincolnshire. [6]CITATION[CLOSE]
Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)

"Kingsbury Hall [Warwickshire], now a farmhouse, is of great antiquity, and appears to have been originally of very considerable extent, and to have been defended by fortifications, of which some vestiges may still be traced. " [7]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.


Early History of the Kingsberray family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Kingsberray research.
Another 223 words (16 lines of text) covering the years 1662, 1603, 1791, 1390, 1380 and 1390 are included under the topic Early Kingsberray History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Kingsberray Spelling Variations


One relatively recent invention that did much to standardize English spelling was the printing press. However, before its invention even the most literate people recorded their names according to sound rather than spelling. The spelling variations under which the name Kingsberray has appeared include Kingsberry, Kingsbury and others.

Early Notables of the Kingsberray family (pre 1700)


Another 30 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Kingsberray Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Kingsberray family to Ireland


Some of the Kingsberray family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 59 words (4 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Kingsberray family to the New World and Oceana


At this time, the shores of the New World beckoned many English families that felt that the social climate in England was oppressive and lacked opportunity for change. Thousands left England at great expense in ships that were overcrowded and full of disease. A great portion of these settlers never survived the journey and even a greater number arrived sick, starving, and without a penny. The survivors, however, were often greeted with greater opportunity than they could have experienced back home. These English settlers made significant contributions to those colonies that would eventually become the United States and Canada. An examination of early immigration records and passenger ship lists revealed that people bearing the name Kingsberray arrived in North America very early: Henry Kingsberry settled in Virginia in 1729; Henry Kingsbury settled in Boston in 1630 with his wife Margaret and son Henry, he later moved to Salem.

The Kingsberray Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Prudens et innoccuus
Motto Translation: Wise and innoccuus


Kingsberray Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Harrison, Henry, Surnames of the United Kingdom: A Concise Etymological Dictionary Baltimore: Geneological Publishing Company, 2013. Print
  2. ^ Smith, Eldson Coles, New Dictionary of American Family Names New York, Harper & Row, 1956. Print
  3. ^ Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  4. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
  5. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  6. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  7. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

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