Jenkean History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The Jenkean surname is derived from the Middle English given name Jenkin, which was in turn created from a diminutive of the name John, with the suffix "kin," added to the name. Generally, the Jenkin variant of this name came from the Devon-Cornwall region.

Early Origins of the Jenkean family

The surname Jenkean was first found in Sussex where Richard Janekyn was recorded in the Subsidy Rolls for Sussex in 1296. Other early records of the name include Richard Jenkins, listed in the Somerset Subsidy Rolls in 1327, William Jonkyn, recorded in the "Calendar of Inquisitiones post mortem" in 1297, Alicia Jonkyn, listed in the Poll Tax of Yorkshire in 1379, well as William Jankins, recorded in the Subsidy Rolls of Worcestershire in 1327. [1]

Early records in the parish of St. Columb, Cornwall note "Higher Trekyninge in the reign of Edward III. appears to have been in a divided state, between the Arundells and Hamleys. It was afterwards for several generations in the family of Jenkin, whose co-heiresses married St. Aubyn, Slanning, Carey, and Trelawney. It is now the property of Richard Rawe, Esq. The site on which the ancient mansion house stood, is supposed by Mr. Whitaker, from its name and concomitant circumstances, to have been the residence of an ancient Cornish king." [2]

Early History of the Jenkean family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Jenkean research. Another 173 words (12 lines of text) covering the years 1601, 1602, 1565, 1584, 1607, 1689, 1731, 1739, 1598, 1678, 1613, 1685, 1681, 1672, 1675, 1676, 1677, 1680, 1681 and are included under the topic Early Jenkean History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Jenkean Spelling Variations

The English language only became standardized in the last few centuries. For that reason, spelling variations are common among many Anglo-Norman names. The shape of the English language was frequently changed with the introduction of elements of Norman French, Latin, and other European languages; even the spelling of literate people's names were subsequently modified. Jenkean has been recorded under many different variations, including Jenkins, Jenkin, Jankins, Jenkynn, Jenkynns, Jenkyns, Jinkines, Jinkins, Jenkens, Junkin, Junkins, Jenkings and many more.

Early Notables of the Jenkean family (pre 1700)

Outstanding amongst the family at this time was John Jenkins (1598-1678), an English composer born in Maidstone, Kent, who served as a musician to the Royal and noble families and composed many pieces for strings. [3] William Jenkyn (1613-1685), was an...
Another 39 words (3 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Jenkean Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Jenkean family to Ireland

Some of the Jenkean family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 57 words (4 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Jenkean family

To escape the uncertainty of the political and religious uncertainty found in England, many English families boarded ships at great expense to sail for the colonies held by Britain. The passages were expensive, though, and the boats were unsafe, overcrowded, and ridden with disease. Those who were hardy and lucky enough to make the passage intact were rewarded with land, opportunity, and social environment less prone to religious and political persecution. Many of these families went on to be important contributors to the young nations of Canada and the United States where they settled. Jenkeans were some of the first of the immigrants to arrive in North America: Oliver Jenkines, who came to Virginia in 1611; David Jinkins, who settled in Virginia, some time between the years 1654-1663; Walter Jenkyns, who settled in Virginia in 1635.



The Jenkean Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Perge sed caute
Motto Translation: Advance but cautiously .


  1. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  2. ^ Hutchins, Fortescue, The History of Cornwall, from the Earliest Records and Traditions to the Present Time. London: William Penaluna, 1824. Print
  3. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print


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