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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2016


The name Hungfart is of Anglo-Saxon origin and came from when a family lived in the market town and civil parish of Hungerford, a market town and civil parish in Berkshire, 9 miles (14.5 km) west of Newbury. It dates back to at least 1101-18 and was derived from the term "hunger ford", meaning "ford leading to poor land." [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)

There is an old legend that "Hingwar the Dane" (Ivarr the Boneless, d. 873?) drowned accidentally while crossing the Kennet, and that the town was named after him. By 1241, it called itself a borough. And in the late 14th century John of Gaunt, medieval lord of the manor granted the people of the village the lucrative fishing rights on the River Kennet.

Hungfart Early Origins



The surname Hungfart was first found in Gloucestershire at Down Ampney, a parish, in the union of Cirencester, chiefly in the hundred of Crowthorne and Minety. "The manor-house, a very interesting specimen of ancient architecture, was formerly one of the many seats of the Hungerford family, and is situated precisely on the border line of the two shires." [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

Farleigh-Hungerford in Somerset was another ancient family seat. " This place derives the adjunct to its name from the distinguished family of Hungerford, for more than 300 years lords of the manor, which was sold in 1370, with the hundred of Wellow, to Sir Thomas Hungerford, steward to John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster.

The castle of Farleigh is of uncertain foundation; it was enlarged in 1378 by Sir Thomas Hungerford, with four towers, of which two are remaining" [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
A brass plate to the memory of Robert de Hungerford can be found in the church of Hungerford, Berkshire.


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Hungfart Spelling Variations


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Hungfart Spelling Variations



Sound was what guided spelling in the essentially pre-literate Middle Ages, so one person's name was often recorded under several variations during a single lifetime. Also, before the advent of the printing press and the first dictionaries, the English language was not standardized. Therefore, spelling variations were common, even among the names of the most literate people. Known variations of the Hungfart family name include Hungerford, Hungerton, Huningford and others.

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Hungfart Early History


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Hungfart Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Hungfart research. Another 329 words (24 lines of text) covering the years 1541, 1330, 1397, 1378, 1449, 1567, 1627, 1503, 1540, 1607, 1657, 1614, 1657, 1614, 1685, 1660, 1611, 1673, 1645, 1660, 1632 and 1711 are included under the topic Early Hungfart History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Hungfart Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Hungfart Early Notables (pre 1700)



Notables of the family at this time include Thomas Hungerford, first recorded Speaker of the House of Commons (1330-1397); Walter Hungerford, 1st Baron Hungerford, Speaker of the House of Commons (1378-1449); Sir Anthony Hungerford of Black Bourton (1567-1627), a religious controversialist; Walter Hungerford, 1st Baron Hungerford of Heytesbury (1503-1540), the first...

Another 123 words (9 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Hungfart Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Hungfart In Ireland


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Hungfart In Ireland



Some of the Hungfart family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. Another 92 words (7 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



For political, religious, and economic reasons, thousands of English families boarded ships for Ireland, the Canadas, the America colonies, and many of smaller tropical colonies in the hope of finding better lives abroad. Although the passage on the cramped, dank ships caused many to arrive in the New World diseased and starving, those families that survived the trip often went on to make valuable contributions to those new societies to which they arrived. Early immigrants bearing the Hungfart surname or a spelling variation of the name include : Joan and Sarah Hungerford settled in Virginia in 1650; John Hungerton settled in Virginia in 1648; Thomas Hungerford settled in New London Conn in 1633..

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Motto


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Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Et Dieu mon appui
Motto Translation: And God my support.


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Hungfart Family Crest Products


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Hungfart Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



  1. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
  2. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

Other References

  1. Library of Congress. American and English Genealogies in the Library of Congress. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1967. Print.
  2. Burke, John Bernard Ed. The Roll of Battle Abbey. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
  3. Ingram, Rev. James. Translator Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 1823. Print.
  4. Filby, P. William and Mary K Meyer. Passenger and Immigration Lists Index in Four Volumes. Detroit: Gale Research, 1985. Print. (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8).
  5. Zieber, Eugene. Heraldry in America. Philadelphia: Genealogical Publishing Co. Print.
  6. Fairbairn. Fairbain's book of Crests of the Families of Great Britain and Ireland, 4th Edition 2 volumes in one. Baltimore: Heraldic Book Company, 1968. Print.
  7. Hanks, Patricia and Flavia Hodges. A Dictionary of Surnames. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988. Print. (ISBN 0-19-211592-8).
  8. Le Patourel, John. The Norman Empire. New York: Oxford University Press, 1976. Print. (ISBN 0-19-822525-3).
  9. Shaw, William A. Knights of England A Complete Record from the Earliest Time to the Present Day of the Knights of all the Orders of Chivalry in England, Scotland, Ireland and Knights Bachelors 2 Volumes. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print. (ISBN 080630443X).
  10. Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds. Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8).
  11. ...

The Hungfart Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Hungfart Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 7 September 2016 at 10:15.

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