Heddend History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The ancestors of the Heddend surname lived among the ancient Anglo-Saxon culture. The name comes from when they lived in the village of Haddon which was in a number of places including Derbyshire, Dorset, Northampton and Roxburgh in Scotland. There is also a place called Hadden Hill in the county of Stafford.

We found this entry for the East Haddon, Northamptonshire: "This place is mentioned in Domesday Book under the names Eddone and Hadone; it then belonged to the Earl of Morton, and among the families who have subsequently held the lands, may be named the family of St. Andrew, of whom notice occurs in the reign of Edward I." [1]

This place-name was originally derived from two Old English words Haeth, which means a heath, and dun which literally means a hill. Therefore the original bearers of the surname Heddend resided near or on a heather-covered hill. [2]

Early Origins of the Heddend family

The surname Heddend was first found in Derbyshire, at either Nether Haddon or Over Haddon, both small villages. Looking back further, we found William Hadon listed in Normandy, France in the Magni Rotuli Scaccarii Normanniae (1180.) [3]

Haddon Hall is an English country house on the River Wye at Bakewell, Derbyshire that dates back to the 11th century when William Peverel, illegitimate son of William the Conqueror, held the manor of Nether Haddon in 1087.

A search through early rolls revealed: Ailwin de Haddun in the Pipe Rolls of 1159; Philip de Haddon in the Assize Rolls for Somerset in 1267; John de Hadden in Northumberland in 1323; and Thomas Haddun in the Yorkshire Poll Tax Rolls of 1379. [4]

"Haddon is the name of parishes in the neighbouring counties of Northampton and Huntingdonshire, in the former of which the surname also occurs. In the 13th century it was a common surname in Huntingdonshire and Oxfordshire." [5]

The Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 had three listings for the family: Robert de Hadden, Oxfordshire; Agnes de Haddon, Oxfordshire; and Jordan de Haddone, Huntingdonshire. [6]

To the north in Scotland, entries were quite a bit later: "Adam Haddane of Dolphington appears in 1679 (Lanark CR.), and Alexander Haddin was married in Edinburgh, 1696. A family named Hadden was long identified with the history of Aberdeenshire." [7]

Early History of the Heddend family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Heddend research. Another 64 words (5 lines of text) covering the years 1159, 1556, 1515, 1572, 1680, 1762 and are included under the topic Early Heddend History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Heddend Spelling Variations

Before English spelling was standardized a few hundred years ago, spelling variations of names were a common occurrence. Elements of Latin, French and other languages became incorporated into English through the Middle Ages, and name spellings changed even among the literate. The variations of the surname Heddend include Haddon, Hadden, Haddan, Haddin and others.

Early Notables of the Heddend family (pre 1700)

Distinguished members of the family include James Haddon ( fl. 1556), an English reforming divine and his brother, Walter Haddon LL.D. (1515-1572), an English civil lawyer, much involved in church and university affairs under Edward...
Another 34 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Heddend Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Ireland Migration of the Heddend family to Ireland

Some of the Heddend family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 50 words (4 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Heddend family

A great wave of immigration to the New World was the result of the enormous political and religious disarray that struck England at that time. Families left for the New World in extremely large numbers. The long journey was the end of many immigrants and many more arrived sick and starving. Still, those who made it were rewarded with an opportunity far greater than they had known at home in England. These emigrant families went on to make significant contributions to these emerging colonies in which they settled. Some of the first North American settlers carried this name or one of its variants: James Hadden in Maryland in 1697 and later moved to Virginia; John Haddin arrived in Philadelphia in 1848; John and Margaret Haddon settled in Salem Massachusetts in 1630.



  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  2. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
  3. ^ The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)
  4. ^ Reaney, P.H and R.M. Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames. London: Routledge, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-415-05737-X)
  5. ^ Lowe, Mark Anthony, Patronymica Britannica, A Dictionary of Family Names of the United Kingdom. London: John Russel Smith, 1860. Print.
  6. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  7. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)


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