Fulertan History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The name Fulertan was first used by the ancient Strathclyde-Briton people of the Scottish/English Borderlands. The first Fulertan to use this name no doubt lived in the barony of Fullertoun in the parish of Dundonald in Ayrshire. That the family assumed the name of where they lived is often indicative the degree of power and influence they held in that area. Fulertan is most definitely such a name, easily identified by the suffix "-ton", meaning "settlement" or "town".

The place in question is almost certainly Fullerton, near Ayr or possibly Foulertoun near Forfar, both in Scotland. Both of these towns derive their name from the word "fuglere", meaning "bird-catcher" (the English word "fowler" has the same origin), indicating that fowl was the primary product of these towns.

Fullarton "which is situated on the southwestern bank of the river Irvine, derives its name from its ancient proprietors, the Fullartons, by one of whom a convent was founded in 1240, on the site of the present town, and amply endowed for friars of the Carmelite order. " [1]

Early Origins of the Fulertan family

The surname Fulertan was first found in Ayrshire (Gaelic: Siorrachd Inbhir Àir), formerly a county in the southwestern Strathclyde region of Scotland, that today makes up the Council Areas of South, East, and North Ayrshire. The earliest evidence of the Fullerton family appeared in the mid 13th century, with Alanus de Fowlertoun who founded and endowed out of his lands a convent of Carmelite or White Friars at Irvine. He died circa 1280 and was succeeded by his son Adam de Fowlerton, who had a charter of the lands of Foullartous and Gaylis in Kyle Stewart a few years after his father's death.

A branch of his family settled in Arran and are said to have received from King Robert the Bruce a charter of the lands of Kilmichael with the office of coroner and the honorary title of Falconer to the King, in 1307. These estates were held for several centuries and in later years the family branched to Kinnaber in Angus. [2]

Gradually many of the estates were lost by marriage, and one of the last was Ballintoy Castle in County Antrim, Ireland which was acquired by the Downings in marriage. From the appointment by Bruce on, a long series of titles belonged to this respectable family. Rankin de Fowlartoun was the dominus de Corsby in the early 15th century and John Fullarton was first minister of Sanquhar after the Reformation.

The most prestigious title held by the family came, however, in 1327 when Robert I granted to Galfridus de Foullertoune (whose name is also recorded as Galfredus Fullerton) the land of Oulertoun in the sheriffdom of Forfar and the hereditary office of falconer within the sheriffdom. The estate was held by the Fullartons for over 120 years before they transferred themselves to the parish of Meigle, in which there are lands which bear the name to this day. [2]

Important Dates for the Fulertan family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Fulertan research. Another 221 words (16 lines of text) covering the years 1707, 1645, 1727, 1720, 1727, 1865, 1588, 1607, 1631, 1603 and 1593 are included under the topic Early Fulertan History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Fulertan Spelling Variations

Scribes in Medieval Scotland spelled names by sound rather than any set of rules, so an enormous number of spelling variations exist in names of that era. Fulertan has been spelled Fullerton, Fullarton, Foulerton, Fowlerton, McCoy and others.

Early Notables of the Fulertan family (pre 1700)

Notable amongst the family at this time was Mr. John Fullerton, Esq. Thribergh in the West Riding of Yorkshire was home to this gentleman for some time. "The parish comprises 1,624a. lr. 27p., of which about 800 acres are arable, 770 pasture, and about 30 woodland, all the property of John Fullerton, Esq., lord of the manor. The soil...
Another 59 words (4 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Fulertan Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Fulertan family to Ireland

Some of the Fulertan family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 303 words (22 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Fulertan family

The number of Strathclyde Clan families sailing for North America increased steadily as the persecution continued. In the colonies, they could find not only freedom from the iron hand of the English government, but land to settle on. The American War of Independence allowed many of these settlers to prove their independence, while some chose to go to Canada as United Empire Loyalists. Scots played essential roles in the forging of both great nations. Among them: Alexander Fullerton who settled in Virginia in 1684.

Citations

  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  2. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)
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