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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2017


The Pictish clans of ancient Scotland were the ancestors of first people to use the name Fivay. The name was found in the barony of Fyvie in the county of Aberdeen. The surname Fivay belongs to the category of habitation names, which are derived from pre-existing names for towns, villages, parishes, or farmsteads.

Fivay Early Origins



The surname Fivay was first found in Aberdeenshire (Gaelic: Siorrachd Obar Dheathain), a historic county, and present day Council Area of Aberdeen, located in the Grampian region of northeastern Scotland, where they held a family seat from very early times, some say long before the Norman Conquest in 1066 A.D. Fyvie is a village on the River Ytham, and the castle is one of the great tower houses of north eastern Scotland.

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Fivay Spelling Variations


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Fivay Spelling Variations



In the Middle ages, spelling and translation were not yet regulated by any general rules. spelling variations in names were common even among members of one family unit. Fivay has appeared Fivie, Fyvie, Fyvey, Fivey, Five, Fyve, Fify and many more.

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Fivay Early History


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Fivay Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Fivay research. Another 197 words (14 lines of text) covering the years 1266, 1340, 1475, 1547 and 1700 are included under the topic Early Fivay History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Fivay Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Fivay Early Notables (pre 1700)



More information is included under the topic Early Fivay Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



Faced by this persecution and the generally unstable political climate of those days, many Scots chose to leave their homeland for Ireland, Australia, and North America in search of greater opportunity and freedom. The colonies across the Atlantic were the most popular choice, but a passage there was neither cheap nor easily suffered. Passengers arrived sick and poor, but those who made it intact often found land and more tolerant societies in which to live. These brave settlers formed the backbone of the burgeoning nations of Canada and the United States. It is only this century that the ancestors of these families have begun to recover their collective identity through the patriotic highland games and Clan societies that have sprung up throughout North America. Research into early immigration and passenger lists revealed many immigrants bearing the name Fivay: David Fivey who settled in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1798.

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Fivay Family Crest Products


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Fivay Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



    Other References

    1. Filby, P. William and Mary K Meyer. Passenger and Immigration Lists Index in Four Volumes. Detroit: Gale Research, 1985. Print. (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8).
    2. Weis, Frederick Lewis, Walter Lee Sheppard and David Faris. Ancestral Roots of Sixty Colonists Who Came to New England Between 1623 and 1650 7th Edition. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0806313676).
    3. Chadwick, Nora Kershaw and J.X.W.P Corcoran. The Celts. London: Penguin, 1970. Print. (ISBN 0140212116).
    4. Colletta, John P. They Came In Ships. Salt Lake City: Ancestry, 1993. Print.
    5. Paul, Sir James Balfour. An Ordinary of Arms Contained in the Public Register of All Arms and Bearings in Scotland Second Edition. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1903. Print.
    6. Burke, Sir Bernard. Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Landed Gentry Including American Families with British Ancestry 2 Volumes. London: Burke Publishing, 1939. Print.
    7. Moncrieffe, Sir Ian of That Ilk and Don Pottinger. Clan Map Scotland of Old. Edinburgh: Bartholomew and Son, 1983. Print.
    8. Bell, Robert. The Book of Ulster Surnames. Belfast: Blackstaff, 1988. Print. (ISBN 10-0856404160).
    9. Adam, Frank. Clans Septs and Regiments of the Scottish Highlands 8th Edition. London: Bacon (G.W.) & Co, 1970. Print. (ISBN 10-0717945006).
    10. Matthews, John. Matthews' American Armoury and Blue Book. London: John Matthews, 1911. Print.
    11. ...

    The Fivay Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Fivay Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

    This page was last modified on 2 May 2013 at 14:09.

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