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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2016


Eppordeand is a name whose ancestors lived among the Picts, a tribe in ancient Scotland. The Eppordeand family lived in Aberdeen (now part of the modern Grampian region). "This ancient city, which is, by some historians, identified with the Devana of Ptolemy, is supposed to have derived its name, of British origin, from its situation between the rivers Dee and Don. According to tradition, Gregory the Great, King of Scotland, is said to have made the town a royal burgh; but little of its authentic history is known prior to the reign of Malcolm III." [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.


Eppordeand Early Origins



The surname Eppordeand was first found in the county of Aberdeenshire (Gaelic: Siorrachd Obar Dheathain), a historic county, and present day Council Area of Aberdeen, located in the Grampian region of northeastern Scotland. One of the first records of the name was John of Aberdene, a merchant of Aberdeen, who was robbed of wool at sea while on a voyage from Aberdeen to St. Omer in 1272. A few years later in 1290, Michael de Abirden was granted land in Berwick. [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)

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Eppordeand Spelling Variations


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Eppordeand Spelling Variations



The appearance of the printing press and the first dictionaries in the last few hundred years did much to standardize spelling. Prior to that time scribes spelled according to sound, a practice that resulted in many spelling variations. Eppordeand has been spelled Aberdeen, Aberdeen, Abirdene, Abirdeen, Aberdein, Abberdene, Abberdeen, Ebirdene and many more.

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Eppordeand Early History


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Eppordeand Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Eppordeand research. Another 93 words (7 lines of text) covering the years 1290, 1295 and 1399 are included under the topic Early Eppordeand History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Eppordeand Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Eppordeand Early Notables (pre 1700)



More information is included under the topic Early Eppordeand Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



The expense of the crossing to the North American colonies seemed small beside the difficulties of remaining in Scotland. It was a long and hard trip, but at its end lay the reward of freedom. Some Scots remained faithful to England and called themselves United Empire Loyalists, while others fought in the American War of Independence. Much of this lost Scottish heritage has been recovered in the last century through Clan societies and other patriotic Scottish organizations. A search of immigration and passenger lists revealed many important, early immigrants to North America bearing the name of Eppordeand: Charles Aberdeen who settled in Fortold in 1774. Nicholas Aberdeen settled in Maryland in 1775.

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Motto


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Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Intermerata fides
Motto Translation: Uncorrupted faith.


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Eppordeand Family Crest Products


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Eppordeand Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  2. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)

Other References

  1. Matthews, John. Matthews' American Armoury and Blue Book. London: John Matthews, 1911. Print.
  2. Bell, Robert. The Book of Ulster Surnames. Belfast: Blackstaff, 1988. Print. (ISBN 10-0856404160).
  3. Barrow, G.W.S Ed. Acts of Malcom IV 1153-65 Volume I Regesta Regum Scottorum 1153-1424. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1960. Print.
  4. Scots Kith and Kin And Illustrated Map Revised 2nd Edition. Edinburgh: Clan House/Albyn. Print.
  5. Catholic Directory For Scotland. Glasgow: Burns Publications. Print.
  6. Scarlett, James D. Tartan The Highland Textile. London: Shepheard-Walwyn, 1990. Print. (ISBN 0-85683-120-4).
  7. Browne, James. The History of Scotland it's Highlands, Regiments and Clans 8 Volumes. Edinburgh: Francis A Niccolls & Co, 1909. Print.
  8. Fulton, Alexander. Scotland and Her Tartans: The Romantic Heritage of the Scottish Clans and Families. Godalming: Bramley, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-86283-880-0).
  9. Crozier, William Armstrong Edition. Crozier's General Armory A Registry of American Families Entitled to Coat Armor. New York: Fox, Duffield, 1904. Print.
  10. Fairbairn,. Fairbain's book of Crests of the Families of Great Britain and Ireland, 4th Edition 2 volumes in one. Baltimore: Heraldic Book Company, 1968. Print.
  11. ...

The Eppordeand Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Eppordeand Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 31 August 2015 at 12:59.

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