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In ancient Scotland, Delrumpyle was a Strathclyde-Briton name for someone who lived in Ayrshire (present day Strathclyde region) and comes from the Gaelic "dail chruim puill", which means "field of the crooked stream." Another source claims the translation a little differently: "this place derives its name, in the Celtic language signifying "the dale of the crooked water," from the situation of its village on a bend of the river Doon. " [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.


Delrumpyle Early Origins



The surname Delrumpyle was first found in Ayrshire (Gaelic: Siorrachd Inbhir Àir), formerly a county in the southwestern Strathclyde region of Scotland, that today makes up the Council Areas of South, East, and North Ayrshire. "The barony, which in ancient times was held by a family who took their name from the lands, was, in the reign of David II., divided into two portions, and held by two families named Dalrymple, descended from one common ancestor." [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
Early records of Clan members mention James Dalrymple, who was a witness on a charter of Robert, Earl of Fife in around 1390. John de Dalrympil was provost of Edinburgh in 1392. Gilbert of Dalrympille was held in the Tower of London as a Scottish prisoner of war; he was released in 1413. James Dalrymple of Stair (1619-1695), was created Viscount of Stair in 1690 by King William. His third son Hew Dalrymple (1652-1737), who held the title of Lord North Berwick was created Baronet of Nova Scotia in 1698. Descended from Hew was Marion (1708-40), who created much controversy in the Clan when she turned down a proposal of marriage in 1732 from the infamous 11th Lord Fraser of Lovat. She would marry Donald Mackay, 4th Lord Reay later in that same year. Dalrymple Clansmen fought in the Scots guard of France, where their name was recorded in the muster rolls as "de Romple".

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Delrumpyle Spelling Variations


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Delrumpyle Spelling Variations



In Medieval times, spelling and translation were not nearly so highly developed as today. They were generally carried out according to the sound and intuition of the bearer. For that reason spelling variations are extremely common among early Scottish names. Delrumpyle has been spelled Dalrymple, Dalrimple, Dalremple, Dalrympel, Dalrimpel and many more.

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Delrumpyle Early History


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Delrumpyle Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Delrumpyle research. Another 409 words (29 lines of text) covering the years 1371, 1413, 1704, 1800, 1619, 1695, 1648, 1707, 1650, 1719, 1652, 1737, 1698, 1737, 1665, 1721, 1720, 1692, 1751, 1650, 1719, 1673, 1747 and 1797 are included under the topic Early Delrumpyle History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Delrumpyle Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Delrumpyle Early Notables (pre 1700)



Notable amongst the family at this time was James Dalrymple, 1st Viscount of Stair (1619-1695), Scottish lawyer and statesman; John Dalrymple the Master of Stair (1648-1707), a Scottish noble; Sir James Dalrymple, 1st Baronet (1650-1719), a Scottish writer, Principal Clerk of Session; Sir Hew Dalrymple, Lord North Berwick (1652-1737), a Scottish...

Another 76 words (5 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Delrumpyle Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Delrumpyle In Ireland


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Delrumpyle In Ireland



Some of the Delrumpyle family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. Another 51 words (4 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



Unrest, poverty, and persecution caused thousands to look for opportunity and freedom in the North American colonies. The crossing was long, overcrowded, and unsanitary, though, and came only at great expense. Many Strathclyde families settled on the east coast of North America in communities that would form the backbone of what would become the great nations of the United States and Canada. The American War of Independence caused those who remained loyal to England to move north to Canada as United Empire Loyalists. In the 20th century, Strathclyde and other Scottish families across North America began to recover their collective heritage through highland games and Clan societies. Among them: Archie Dalrymple who settled in North Carolina followed by Mary in 1775; and William in 1775.

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Delrumpyle Family Crest Products


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Delrumpyle Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



  1. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.

Other References

  1. Burke, Sir Bernard. Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Landed Gentry Including American Families with British Ancestry 2 Volumes. London: Burke Publishing, 1939. Print.
  2. Hanks, Patricia and Flavia Hodges. A Dictionary of Surnames. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988. Print. (ISBN 0-19-211592-8).
  3. Hinde, Thomas Ed. The Domesday Book England's Heritage Then and Now. Surrey: Colour Library Books, 1995. Print. (ISBN 1-85833-440-3).
  4. Bain, Robert. The Clans and Tartans of Scotland. Glasgow & London: Collins, 1968. Print. (ISBN 000411117-6).
  5. Scots Kith and Kin And Illustrated Map Revised 2nd Edition. Edinburgh: Clan House/Albyn. Print.
  6. Skene, William Forbes Edition. Chronicles of the Picts, Chronicles of the Scots and Other Early Memorials of Scottish History. Edinburgh: H.M. General Register House, 1867. Print.
  7. Le Patourel, John. The Norman Empire. New York: Oxford University Press, 1976. Print. (ISBN 0-19-822525-3).
  8. Urquhart, Blair Edition. Tartans The New Compact Study Guide and Identifier. Secauccus, NJ: Chartwell Books, 1994. Print. (ISBN 0-7858-0050-6).
  9. Barrow, G.W.S Ed. Acts of Malcom IV 1153-65 Volume I Regesta Regum Scottorum 1153-1424. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1960. Print.
  10. Bowman, George Ernest. The Mayflower Reader A Selection of Articales from The Mayflower Descendent. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
  11. ...

The Delrumpyle Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Delrumpyle Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 15 March 2016 at 09:15.

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