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De coursey History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms




Early Origins of the De coursey family


The surname De coursey was first found in Ile-de-France, where the family has been a prominent family for centuries, and held a family seat with lands and manor. The family were well established in the region of Paris and several members of the family distinguished themselves through their contributions toward the community in which they lived and were rewarded with lands, titles and letters patent confirming their nobility. They branched north to Normandy in the arrondisement of Falaise at Coulliboeuf.

Early History of the De coursey family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our De coursey research.
Another 94 words (7 lines of text) covering the year 1176 is included under the topic Early De coursey History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

De coursey Spelling Variations


Spelling variations of this family name include: Courcey, Courcy, Courciey, Courcei, Courcys, Courcie, Courci, Courrcey, Corcey, Coursy, de Courci, de Courcy, Curcy and many more.

Early Notables of the De coursey family (pre 1700)


More information is included under the topic Early De coursey Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the De coursey family to the New World and Oceana


Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

De coursey Settlers in United States in the 20th Century

  • Emily De Coursey, aged 36, who arrived in New York in 1907 aboard the ship "Zeeland" from Dover [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
    "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JX2Z-PNP : 6 December 2014), Emily De Coursey, 08 Oct 1907; citing departure port Dover, arrival port New York, ship name Zeeland, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  • Hugh De Coursey, aged 23, who arrived in New York in 1919 aboard the ship "Caronia" from Liverpool, England [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J6WL-RTL : 6 December 2014), Hugh De Coursey, 19 Aug 1919; citing departure port Liverpool, arrival port New York, ship name Caronia, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  • John J. DeCoursey, aged 19, who arrived in New York in 1922 aboard the ship "Capillo" from Buenos Aires, Argentina [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
    "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JNVK-22V : 6 December 2014), John J. DeCoursey, 26 Sep 1922; citing departure port Buenos Aires, arrival port New York, ship name Capillo, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).

De coursey Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century

  • Mary Mullany DeCoursey, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1835

Contemporary Notables of the name De coursey (post 1700)


  • Peter L. "Pete" DeCoursey (1961-2014), American reporter of political news in Pennsylvania
  • Patricia DeCoursey, nee Jackson, American leading researcher in the field of chronobiology
  • Tom DeCoursey, American Democrat politician, Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Idaho, 1940 [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, November 11) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  • T. W. DeCoursey, American politician, Mayor of Newport, Kentucky, 1852-53 [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, November 11) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  • James DeCoursey, American Democrat politician, Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Kansas, 1928 [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, November 11) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  • DeCoursey Fales (1888-1966), American lawyer, banker, collector, bibliophile and yachtsman, author of The Fales Family of Bristol, Rhode Island (1919)

The De coursey Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Vincit omnia veritas
Motto Translation: Truth conquers all things.


De coursey Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JX2Z-PNP : 6 December 2014), Emily De Coursey, 08 Oct 1907; citing departure port Dover, arrival port New York, ship name Zeeland, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  2. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J6WL-RTL : 6 December 2014), Hugh De Coursey, 19 Aug 1919; citing departure port Liverpool, arrival port New York, ship name Caronia, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  3. ^ "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JNVK-22V : 6 December 2014), John J. DeCoursey, 26 Sep 1922; citing departure port Buenos Aires, arrival port New York, ship name Capillo, NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
  4. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, November 11) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html


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