Cuttance History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

Cuttance is a name of Anglo-Saxon origin and came from the baptismal name which means Custance. Alternatively the name could have been a local name for someone from Coutance, a location name in Normandy. [1]

Early Origins of the Cuttance family

The surname Cuttance was first found in the Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 as both a forename and surname: Constance, or Custance de Byerne, Nottinghamshire; John Custaunce, Cambridgeshire; Henry filius Custance, Cambridgeshire; and Custance Burnard, Cambridgeshire.

Later the Yorkshire Poll Tax Rolls of 1379 continued this tradition with: Custance de Bergh; and Adam Custanson. "The last two instances entered together are probably mother and son. " [2]

Early History of the Cuttance family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Cuttance research. Another 55 words (4 lines of text) covering the years 1273, 1379, 1629, 1801, 1650, 1669, 1881 and 1904 are included under the topic Early Cuttance History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Cuttance Spelling Variations

Spelling variations in names were a common occurrence before English spelling was standardized a few hundred years ago. In the Middle Ages, even the literate spelled their names differently as the English language incorporated elements of French, Latin, and other European languages. Many variations of the name Cuttance have been found, including Custerson, Custer, Custance, Constance, Custeson and others.

Early Notables of the Cuttance family (pre 1700)

Notables of the family at this time include Sir Roger Cuttance (fl. 1650-1669), an English Captain in the navy, a native of Weymouth, Dorset. [3] Hambleton Custance, was a Lieutenant-Colonel...
Another 29 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Cuttance Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


Australia Cuttance migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Cuttance Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Henry Cuttance, aged 23, who arrived in South Australia in 1851 aboard the ship "Wanderer" [4]
  • Henry Cuttance, aged 23, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Wanderer" in 1851 [4]
  • Mr. Warren Cuttance, (b. 1834), aged 18, Cornish agricultural labourer departing from Plymouth on 29th August 1852 aboard the ship "Bombay" arriving in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia on 14th December 1852 [5]
  • Mr. Eli Cuttance, (b. 1832), aged 20, Cornish agricultural labourer departing from Plymouth on 29th August 1852 aboard the ship "Bombay" arriving in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia on 14th December 1852 [5]
  • Mr. Lisle Cuttance, (b. 1830), aged 24, Cornish agricultural labourer departing from Plymouth on 30th October 1853 aboard the ship "Omega" arriving in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia on 17th January 1854 [5]
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)


The Cuttance Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Appetitus rationi pareat
Motto Translation: Let your desires obey your reason.


  1. ^ Barber, Henry, British Family Names London: Elliot Stock, 62 Paternoster Row, 1894. Print.
  2. ^ Bardsley, C.W, A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6)
  3. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print
  4. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) WANDERER 1851. Retrieved http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1851Wanderer.htm
  5. ^ Cornwall Online Parish Clerks. (Retrieved 3rd May 2018). Retrieved from http://www.opc-cornwall.org/Resc/pdfs/emigration_australia_victoria.pdf


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