Cramp History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The Anglo-Saxon name Cramp comes from when the family resided in Worcester. The surname is derived from the word Crump, which originated as a nickname for a person who was crooked in the physical sense of stooping with age or illness.

Early Origins of the Cramp family

The surname Cramp was first found in Worcestershire where they held a family seat from early times.

Important Dates for the Cramp family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Cramp research. Another 68 words (5 lines of text) covering the years 1200, 1275, 1523, and 1610 are included under the topic Early Cramp History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Cramp Spelling Variations

The English language only became standardized in the last few centuries; therefore, spelling variations are common among early Anglo-Saxon names. As the form of the English language changed, even the spelling of literate people's names evolved. Cramp has been recorded under many different variations, including Cramp, Cram, Cromp, Crompe, Cramb, Crampe, Crame and many more.

Early Notables of the Cramp family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Cramp Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Cramp migration to the United States

For many English families, the political and religious disarray that shrouded England made the far away New World an attractive prospect. On cramped disease-ridden ships, thousands migrated to those British colonies that would eventually become Canada and the United States. Those hardy settlers that survived the journey often went on to make important contributions to the emerging nations in which they landed. Analysis of immigration records indicates that some of the first North American immigrants bore the name Cramp or a variant listed above:

Cramp Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • William Cramp, who arrived in Maryland in 1657 [1]
  • Peter Cramp, who arrived in Virginia in 1664 [1]
  • Walter Cramp, who settled in Virginia in 1698 with his family
Cramp Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • East Cramp, who settled in Virginia in 1741
  • Charles Cramp, who landed in Pennsylvania in 1765 [1]
  • John Cramp, who landed in North Carolina in 1767 [1]
  • John, Cramp Jr., who landed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1772 [1]
Cramp Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • James Cramp, who arrived in New York in 1831 [1]
  • Samuel Cramp, who landed in New York, NY in 1846 [1]
  • F. Cramp, aged 27, who immigrated to the United States, in 1892
  • Howard Cramp, aged 30, who immigrated to the United States from Liverpool, in 1892
  • J. Cramp, aged 19, who settled in America from London, in 1892
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Cramp Settlers in United States in the 20th Century
  • Walter J. Cramp, who immigrated to America, in 1903
  • W.S. Cramp, aged 5, who immigrated to the United States, in 1903
  • Mrs. Walter S. Cramp, aged 34, who immigrated to the United States, in 1903
  • Francis Cramp, aged 21, who immigrated to America, in 1906
  • Arthur L. Cramp, aged 20, who landed in America from Coventry, England, in 1907
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Cramp migration to Canada

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Cramp Settlers in Canada in the 20th Century
  • F. H. Cramp, aged 42, who immigrated to Toronto, in 1907
  • Harold Cramp, aged 12, who settled in Toronto, Canada, in 1909
  • Mary Cramp, aged 48, who settled in Newfoundland, in 1909
  • Reginald Cramp, aged 8, who settled in Toronto, Canada, in 1909
  • Rose Cramp, aged 35, who settled in Toronto, Canada, in 1909
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Cramp migration to Australia

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Cramp Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Julia Maria Cramp, English convict from Sussex, who was transported aboard the "Arab" on December 14, 1835, settling in Van Diemen's Land, Australia [2]
  • William Cramp, aged 25, a labourer, who arrived in South Australia in 1852 aboard the ship "Medina" [3]

Cramp migration to New Zealand

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Cramp Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • William Cramp, aged 32, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Celestial Queen" in 1872
  • Hannah Cramp, aged 33, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Celestial Queen" in 1872
  • Mr. John Cramp, (b. 1862), aged 17, British settler travelling from Plymouth aboard the ship "Stad Haarlem" arriving in Wellington, New Zealand in 1879 [4]
  • Mr. Frederick Cramp, (b. 1858), aged 21, British settler travelling from Plymouth aboard the ship "Stad Haarlem" arriving in Lyttleton, Christchurch, South Island, New Zealand on 14th April 1879 [4]

Contemporary Notables of the name Cramp (post 1700)

  • Tony Cramp, American soldier, posthumous recipient of the Distinguished Service Cross during World War I
  • William Cramp, American founder of William Cramp & Sons Shipbuilding Company of Philadelphia in 1825, one of the largest ders of the late 19th century
  • William M. Cramp, American politician, U.S. Vice Consul in Istanbul, 1932 [5]
  • John F. Cramp, American Republican politician, Delegate to Republican National Convention from Pennsylvania, 1960 [5]
  • Stanley Cramp (1913-1987), British civil servant and ornithologist, the first Chief Editor of the encyclopaedic nine-volume handbook The Birds of the Western Palearctic (BWP)

Citations

  1. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  2. ^ State Library of Queensland. (Retrieved 2015, January 8) Arab voyage to Van Diemen's Land, Australia in 1835 with 132 passengers. Retrieved from http://www.convictrecords.com.au/ships/arab/1835
  3. ^ South Australian Register Tuesday 3 February 1852. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) MEDINA 1852. Retrieved http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/australia/medina1852.shtml
  4. ^ New Zealand Yesteryears Passenger Lists 1800 to 1900 (Retrieved 26th March 2019). Retrieved from http://www.yesteryears.co.nz/shipping/passlist.html
  5. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, December 1) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
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