Byngghan History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The name Byngghan was brought to England in the wave of migration that followed the Norman Conquest of 1066. The Byngghan family lived at Bingham in the county of Nottinghamshire. The name of that place is derived from the Old Norse word bingr, meaning stall or manger, and the Old English word ham, meaning settlement or village. Another reference claims the family descended from "De Buisli, from Buisli or Builly, near Neûchatel, Normandy (often supposed to be of Saxon origin.)" [1] The same reference claims "Roger de Busliaco held 149 lordships in barony 1086, chiefly in York [Yorkshire] and Notts [Nottinghamshire], which were entitled the Honour of Tickhill. He also held Sutton, Somerset, from Roger de Arundel. One of his lordships was Bingham, Notts, and estate of great value and importance." [1] Whichever origin the reader chooses, there is no doubt that Norfolk was the stronghold of the family since ancient times.

Early Origins of the Byngghan family

The surname Byngghan was first found in Nottinghamshire at Bingham, a market town in the Rushcliffe borough that has existed since at least the Domesday Book where it was listed as Bingheham [2] which probably meant "homestead of the family or followers of a man called Bynna" from the Old English personal name + ham. [3] "This place was possessed previously to the Conquest by two Saxon chieftains, and appears to have been anciently more extensive than at present: it had a college, or guild, in honour of St. Mary. " [4]

One of the first records of the family was Simon Binham or Bynham ( fl. 1335), English chronicler, a monk of the priory of Binham, Norfolk, one of the cells belonging to the abbey of St. Albans. [5]

A few years later, William Binham or Bynham (fl. 1370), the English theologian, was a native of Binham in Norfolk, where there was a Benedictine priory dependent on the abbey of St. Albans. [5] One may presume that the above two people were related as they both came from the same priory, but there is no written proof.

Important Dates for the Byngghan family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Byngghan research. Another 88 words (6 lines of text) covering the years 1090, 1246, 1300, 1915, 1528, 1599, 1584, 1607, 1689, 1689, 1606, 1607, 1615, 1673, 1645, 1659, 1668, 1723, 1573, 1658, 1607, 1639, 1625, 1682, 1662, 1654, 1714, 1692, 1714 and are included under the topic Early Byngghan History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Byngghan Spelling Variations

Spelling variations in names were a common occurrence in the eras before English spelling was standardized a few hundred years ago. In the Middle Ages, even the literate regularly changed the spellings of their names as the English language incorporated elements of French, Latin, and other European languages. Many variations of the name Byngghan have been found, including Bingham, Binham, Bingam, Binghame and others.

Early Notables of the Byngghan family (pre 1700)

Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Sir Richard Bingham or Byngham (1528-1599), English Governor of Connaught, the third son of Richard Bingham, of Melcombe-Bingham, Dorsetshire. "In 1584, Bingham was appointed Governor of Connaught, and knighted at Dublin Castle by Lord-Deputy Perrot on 12 July. " [5] John Bingham (1607-1689), was an English divine, born at Derby, and as he was in his eighty-second year when he died in 1689...
Another 70 words (5 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Byngghan Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Byngghan family to Ireland

Some of the Byngghan family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 148 words (11 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Byngghan family

For many English families, the social climate in England was oppressive and lacked opportunity for change. For such families, the shores of Ireland, Australia, and the New World beckoned. They left their homeland at great expense in ships that were overcrowded and full of disease. Many arrived after the long voyage sick, starving, and without a penny. But even those were greeted with greater opportunity than they could have experienced back home. Numerous English settlers who arrived in the United States and Canada at this time went on to make important contributions to the developing cultures of those countries. Many of those families went on to make significant contributions to the rapidly developing colonies in which they settled. Early North American records indicate many people bearing the name Byngghan were among those contributors: Thomas Bingham who settled in Boston Massachusetts in 1673; William Bingham settled in Barbados in 1635; and John Bingham settled in Virginia in 1653..

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Citations

  1. ^ The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X)
  2. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  3. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
  4. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of England. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.
  5. ^ Smith, George (ed), Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1885-1900. Print
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