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Barynd History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



The name Barynd is an occupational surname, deriving from word for the title of a Baron. The surname Barynd was also applied as a nickname to a person with a regal or dignified bearing reminiscent of a baron. The Gaelic form of the name Barynd is Barún.

Early Origins of the Barynd family


The surname Barynd was first found in County Waterford (Irish: Port Láirge), anciently the Deise region, on the South coast of Ireland in the Province of Munster, where they were granted lands by Strongbow, Earl of Pembroke, for their assistance on his invasion of Ireland.

Early History of the Barynd family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Barynd research.
Another 205 words (15 lines of text) covering the years 1640, 1500, 1610, 1696, 1607, 1651 and 1651 are included under the topic Early Barynd History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Barynd Spelling Variations


Church officials and medieval scribes spelled names as they sounded; therefore, single person, could have his name spelt many different ways during their lifetime. While investigating the origins of the name Barynd, many spelling variations were encountered, including: Barron, Baron, Barone, Barrone and others.

Early Notables of the Barynd family (pre 1700)


Notable amongst the family up to this time was Bonaventure Baron, O.F.M., (1610-1696), Irish Franciscan friar who was a noted theologian, philosopher, teacher and writer of Latin prose and verse; and his...
Another 31 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Barynd Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Barynd family to the New World and Oceana


In the 1840s, Ireland experienced a mass exodus to North America due to the Great Potato Famine. These families wanted to escape from hunger and disease that was ravaging their homeland. With the promise of work, freedom and land overseas, the Irish looked upon British North America and the United States as a means of hope and prosperity. Those that survived the journey were able to achieve this through much hard work and perseverance. Early immigration and passenger lists revealed many bearing the name Barynd: Ellis Barron who settled in Watertown in 1640 from Waterford; Robert Barron settled in Virginia in 1634; Elizeus Barron who settled in Woodbridge New Jersey in 1705.

The Barynd Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Fortuna juvat audaces
Motto Translation: Fortune favours the brave


Barynd Family Crest Products



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