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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2016


The Celtic name of Aprobert was derived from the rugged landscape of Wales. This old, proud name is derived from the personal name Robin. The surname Aprobert features the distinctive Welsh patronymic prefix ap-. The original form of the name was ap-Robin, but the prefix has been assimilated into the surname over the course of time and the overall spelling has sometimes been extensively altered.

Aprobert Early Origins



The surname Aprobert was first found in Cheshire, where they held a family seat. Said to be descended from Ynyr, King of Gwent, the family held estates at Oldcastle and Newton. From Malpas they were a strong influence in West Cheshire, and Wirral life about the year 1200.

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Aprobert Spelling Variations


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Aprobert Spelling Variations



Although there are not an extremely large number Welsh surnames, there are an inordinately large number of spelling variations of those surnames. This variety of spellings began almost immediately after the acceptance of surnames within Welsh society. As time progressed, these old Brythonic names were eventually were recorded in English. This process was problematic in that many of the highly inflected sounds of the native language of Wales could not be properly captured in English. Some families, however, did decide to modify their own names to indicate a branch loyalty within the family, a religious adherence, or even a patriotic affiliation. The name Aprobert has seen various spelling variations: Probyn, Probin, Probbin, Probbyn, Propert, Probert, Proppert, Probins, Probyns, Ap Robin, Ap Robert, Proby and many more.

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Aprobert Early History


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Aprobert Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Aprobert research. Another 249 words (18 lines of text) covering the years 1576, 1545, 1550, 1874, 1726, 1902, 1632, 1689, 1660, 1679, 1679, 1685, 1639, 1710, 1693, 1695, 1698 and 1702 are included under the topic Early Aprobert History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Aprobert Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Aprobert Early Notables (pre 1700)



Prominent amongst the family during the late Middle Ages was Sir Heneage Proby of Elton Huntingdonshire; and his son, Sir Thomas Proby, 1st Baronet (1632-1689), an...

Another 26 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Aprobert Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Aprobert In Ireland


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Aprobert In Ireland



Some of the Aprobert family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. Another 93 words (7 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



In the 1800s and 1900s, many Welsh families left for North America, in search of land, work, and freedom. Those who made the trip successfully helped contribute to the growth of industry, commerce, and the cultural heritage of both Canada and the United States. In the immigration and passenger lists were a number of people bearing the name Aprobert

Aprobert Settlers in United States in the 17th Century

  • Hugh ApRobert, accompanied by his mother Katherine Owen, his wife and five children, arrived in Pennsylvania in 1683
  • Hugh ApRobert, who landed in Pennsylvania in 1683

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Motto


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Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Manus haec inimica tyrannis
Motto Translation: This hand is hostile to tyrants.


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Aprobert Family Crest Products


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Aprobert Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



    Other References

    1. Matthews, John. Matthews' American Armoury and Blue Book. London: John Matthews, 1911. Print.
    2. Ingram, Rev. James. Translator Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 1823. Print.
    3. Crozier, William Armstrong Edition. Crozier's General Armory A Registry of American Families Entitled to Coat Armor. New York: Fox, Duffield, 1904. Print.
    4. MacAulay, Thomas Babington. History of England from the Accession of James the Second 4 volumes. New York: Harper and Brothers, 1879. Print.
    5. Rowlands, John, John Rowlands and Sheila Rowlands. Welsh Family History: A Guide to Research. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1999. Print. (ISBN 080631620).
    6. Leeson, Francis L. Dictionary of British Peerages. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1986. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-1121-5).
    7. Evans, Gwynfor. Wales: A History: 2000 Years of Welsh History. New York: Barnes and Noble, 1996. Print. (ISBN 0-76070-120-2).
    8. Bullock, L.G. Historical Map of England and Wales. Edinburgh: Bartholomew and Son, 1971. Print.
    9. Colletta, John P. They Came In Ships. Salt Lake City: Ancestry, 1993. Print.
    10. Bradford, William. History of Plymouth Plantation 1620-1647 Edited by Samuel Eliot Morrison 2 Volumes. New York: Russell and Russell, 1968. Print.
    11. ...

    The Aprobert Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Aprobert Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

    This page was last modified on 17 September 2013 at 13:27.

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