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Whatlee History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



Whatlee is one of the many names that the Normans brought with them when they conquered England in 1066. The Whatlee family lived in Somerset, at the village of Whatley. Whateley Hall was a stately home in the Warwickshire countryside near Castle Bromwich. Built in the 18th century, the hall and the estate was demolished in the 1930s and the land was sold to build houses.


Early Origins of the Whatlee family


The surname Whatlee was first found in Somerset in the village and manor of Whatley near Frome, where they are conjecturally believed to be descended from the possessor of those lands, at the taking of the Domesday Survey in 1086, John the Usher, from Glastonbury Abbey. The Wheatley variant can be found throughout England, specifically: Wheatley, Oxfordshire; Wheatley Lane in Lancashire; and North and South Wheatley in Nottinghamshire. The two latter villages are listed in the Domesday Book as Watelei and Wateleie. [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
Literally, Wheately means "clearing where wheat is grown," from the Old English "hwaete" + "leah." [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)

Some believe that Anne Whateley was William Shakespeare's first betrothed; whether she even existed is much in debate. A William Shakspeare and Anne Whateley do appear on the same line in a note in the Episcopal register at Worcester, but some claim that there were numerous William Shakespeares in that area at that time and was obviously another person. Others believe that entry was a clerical error. The debate continues.


Early History of the Whatlee family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Whatlee research.
Another 130 words (9 lines of text) covering the years 1330, 1582, 1768, 1686, 1742, 1747, 1801, 1753, 1784, 1583 and 1639 are included under the topic Early Whatlee History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Whatlee Spelling Variations


Before the advent of the printing press and the first dictionaries, the English language was not standardized. Sound was what guided spelling in the Middle Ages, so one person's name was often recorded under several variations during a single lifetime. Spelling variations were common, even among the names of the most literate people. Known variations of the Whatlee family name include Whatley, Whatly, Whately, Wheatley, Whetly, Whettell and many more.

Early Notables of the Whatlee family (pre 1700)


Outstanding amongst the family at this time was Charles Wheatly (1686-1742), an English clergyman from London, known for writings on the Book of Common Prayer; Francis Wheatley (1747-1801), an English portrait and landscape painter...
Another 33 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Whatlee Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Whatlee family to the New World and Oceana


To escape the political and religious chaos of this era, thousands of English families began to migrate to the New World in search of land and freedom from religious and political persecution. The passage was expensive and the ships were dark, crowded, and unsafe; however, those who made the voyage safely were encountered opportunities that were not available to them in their homeland. Many of the families that reached the New World at this time went on to make important contributions to the emerging nations of the United States and Canada. Research into various historical records has revealed some of first members of the Whatlee family to immigrate North America: Richard Whately, who settled in Barbados in 1670; David Whatley settled in Pennsylvania in 1772; J. D. Whatley settled in San Francisco, Cal. in 1850.

Whatlee Family Crest Products



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Citations


  1. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  2. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)


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