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Robyn History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



Among the all the peoples of ancient Scotland, the first to use the name Robyn were the Strathclyde- Britons. It was a name for someone who lived in Peeblesshire. The Robyn surname was also a patronymic name created from the personal name Robin, a pet form of Robert.


Early Origins of the Robyn family


The surname Robyn was first found in Peeblesshire (Gaelic: Siorrachd nam Pùballan), former county in South-central Scotland, in the present day Scottish Borders Council Area, where they held a family seat from early times and their first records appeared on the early census rolls taken by the early Kings of Scotland to determine the rate of taxation of their subjects.

Early History of the Robyn family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Robyn research.
Another 55 words (4 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Robyn History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Robyn Spelling Variations


The variation in the spelling of Medieval names is a result of the lack of spelling rules in the English language prior to the last few hundred years. Before that time, scribes spelled according to sound, often varying the spelling of name within a single document. Robyn has appeared as Robbins, Robbyns, Robens, Robins, Robin and others.

Early Notables of the Robyn family (pre 1700)


More information is included under the topic Early Robyn Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Robyn family to the New World and Oceana


As the persecution of Clan families continued, they sailed for North America in increasing numbers. In most cases, they found the freedom and opportunity they sought. Land was often available and the American War of Independence allowed Scots an opportunity to solidify their independence from the English crown. These settlers and their ancestors went on to play essential roles in the forging of the nations of the United States and Canada. Among them:

Robyn Settlers in United States in the 19th Century

  • Wilhim Robyn, aged 30, who arrived in Missouri in 1844 [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)

Contemporary Notables of the name Robyn (post 1700)


  • Robyn Troup (b. 1988), American singer and winner of the "My Grammy Moment" contest organized by NARAS and Yahoo! Music in 2007
  • Robyn R. Warhol (b. 1955), American literary scholar, Arts and Humanities Distinguished Professor of English at the Ohio State University
  • Robyn Hamlin, American Republican politician, Candidate for U.S. Representative from Missouri 1st District, 2012 [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2016, January 26) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  • Robyn Foyster, Australian editor of The Australian Women's Weekly (2007-2009)
  • Robyn Hyden (b. 1972), American actress, known for her work on Maximum Thrust (2003), Fire Cell (2009) and Interception (2011)
  • Robyn Mary McSweeney (b. 1957), Australian politician, Minister for Child Protection; Community Services; Seniors and Volunteering; Women's Interests; Youth (2010-)
  • Robyn Elaine Lively (b. 1972), American actress, best known for her role in the film Teen Witch
  • Robyn Karney, British film writer and former critic for the Empire film magazine
  • Robyn Gabel (b. 2010), American politician, Member of the Illinois House of Representatives
  • Robyn MacPhee (b. 1983), Canadian gold and two-time bronze medalist curler from Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island

The Robyn Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Vivit post funera virtus
Motto Translation: Virtue lives after death


Robyn Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  2. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2016, January 26) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html


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