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Riddick History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms


Origins Available: English, Scottish


Early Origins of the Riddick family


The surname Riddick was first found in Kirkcudbright, where they held a family seat. They held a family seat in the barony of Reddick, slurred as in Berwick from Red Wick. The early pronunciation of the name was Rerrick, hence, Archdeacon Gilbert de Rerrick of Glasgow who was elected to Scottish Parliament in 1467. At this time the name took on the more modern spelling of Reddik, and John Reddik was chief of his name in 1599. He held a family seat at Barharrow.

Early History of the Riddick family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Riddick research.
Another 153 words (11 lines of text) covering the years 164 and 1646 are included under the topic Early Riddick History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Riddick Spelling Variations


Spelling variations of this family name include: Reddick, Redick, Redicke, Riddock, Riddoch, Ridock, Riddick and many more.

Early Notables of the Riddick family (pre 1700)


More information is included under the topic Early Riddick Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Riddick family to the New World and Oceana


Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Riddick Settlers in United States in the 20th Century

  • Martin Riddick, aged 26, who landed in America from Leeds, in 1901
  • Andrew Riddick, aged 26, who emigrated to the United States from Southampton, England, in 1907
  • James Riddick, aged 20, who settled in America from Kilrush, Ireland, in 1907
  • John Riddick, aged 27, who emigrated to America from Dumfries, in 1907
  • Wm. James Riddick, aged 48, who settled in America from Bodmin, England, in 1910
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Riddick Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century

  • Mr. Philip Riddick Sr., U.E. who settled in Ameliasburgh [Prince Edward County], Ontario c. 1784 [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Rubincam, Milton. The Old United Empire Loyalists List. Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc, 1976. (Originally published as; United Empire Loyalists. The Centennial of the Settlement of Upper Canada. Rose Publishing Company, 1885.) ISBN 0-8063-0331-X

Riddick Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century

  • William Riddick, aged 19, a labourer, who arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship "Velocity"

Contemporary Notables of the name Riddick (post 1700)


  • Raymond Ernest Riddick (1917-1976), American football player and coach
  • Robbert Lee Riddick (b. 1957), American NFL football running back
  • Steven Earl "Steve" Riddick (1951-1976), American gold medalist relay runner at the 1976 Summer Olympics
  • Andre Riddick (b. 1973), American professional basketball player
  • Graham Edward Galloway Riddick (b. 1955), English Conservative Party Member of Parliament for Colne Valley in West Yorkshire
  • James Riddick Partington (1886-1965), British chemist and historian of chemistry, fellow and council member of the Chemical Society of London
  • Riddick Lamont Bowe (b. 1967), American boxer, two-time World Heavyweight Champion
  • Riddick Waverly Gatling (1871-1958), American Democrat politician, Member of North Carolina State House of Representatives from Gates County, 1919-22; Postmaster [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, November 3) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  • Riddick Gatling Jr. (1833-1912), American politician, Member of North Carolina State House of Representatives from Gates County, 1870-72, 1887-88, 1891-92 [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, November 3) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  • Riddick Gatling (1797-1868), American politician, Member of North Carolina House of Commons from Gates County, 1844-47 [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, November 3) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html

The Riddick Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Tu ne cede malis
Motto Translation: Yield not to misfortunes.


Riddick Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Rubincam, Milton. The Old United Empire Loyalists List. Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc, 1976. (Originally published as; United Empire Loyalists. The Centennial of the Settlement of Upper Canada. Rose Publishing Company, 1885.) ISBN 0-8063-0331-X
  2. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, November 3) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html

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