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Poage History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms



The roots of the name Poage are found among the Strathclyde-Briton people of the ancient Scottish/English Borderlands. Poage was originally found at Pollok (Gaelic: Pollag), a large district on the south-western side of the city of Glasgow, home to Crookston Castle, where Mary, Queen of Scots, was once held. The name of the town has Gaelic origins, from the word 'poll', meaning "pool" or "pit".


Early Origins of the Poage family


The surname Poage was first found in Renfrewshire (Gaelic: Siorrachd Rinn Friù), a historic county of Scotland, today encompassing the Council Areas of Renfrew, East Renfrewshire, and Iverclyde, in the Strathclyde region of southwestern Scotland, where the first occurrence of the name is Peter, son of Fulbert or Fulburt who was granted the lands of Upper Pollock by the High Steward, and who took the surname from the lands, making him the first Pollock. Peter gave the church of Pulloc and its pertinents to the monastery of Paisley, sometime between 1177 and 1199. Within that same period of time, he also confirmed the charter of his brother Helias of Perthic to the same house. Peter also possessed lands in Moray and circa 1175, he witnessed the charter by William the Lion granting Burgin to the Abbey of Kinlos.

Circa 1230, Murial de Polloc, a daughter of Peter, gifted her land of Inuerorkel and all its pertinents for the benefit of the hospital erected beside the bridge of Spey for the reception of travelers. Continuing this pattern of generosity, Robert de Pollok granted to the monastery of Paisley, during the reign of Alexander II, alms of twelve pennies a year from the rents he earned from his lands. Other important Pollocks include John Pollok who was both steward of the Abbey of Arbroath and sheriff of Forfar.


Early History of the Poage family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Poage research.
Another 220 words (16 lines of text) covering the years 1234, 1272, 1590, 1603, 1827, 1660 and are included under the topic Early Poage History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Poage Spelling Variations


It is only in the last few hundred years that rules have developed and the process of spelling according to sound has been abandoned. Scottish names from before that time tend to appear under many different spelling variations. Poage has been spelled Pollock, Pollocke, Polk, Polke, Pollok, Pollick, Polloch, Pook, Pooke, Poock, Pogue, Poag, Poage, Poague, Poak and many more.

Early Notables of the Poage family (pre 1700)


More information is included under the topic Early Poage Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Poage family to Ireland


Some of the Poage family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 96 words (7 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Poage family to the New World and Oceana


Unwelcome in their beloved homeland, many Scots sailed for the colonies of North America. There, they found land and freedom, and even the opportunity to make a new nation in the American War of Independence. These Scottish settlers played essential roles in the founding of the United States, and the shaping of contemporary North America. Among them:

Poage Settlers in United States in the 18th Century

  • Robert Poage, who settled in Virginia in 1740
  • Robert Poage, who arrived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1740 [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)

Contemporary Notables of the name Poage (post 1700)


  • Richard M. Poage, American Yondan (4th Degree Black Belt) in Kobayashi Shorin-Ryu Karate
  • Ray Poage (b. 1940), American football tight end in the National Football League
  • George Coleman Poage (1880-1962), first African American athlete to win a medal in the Olympic Games, he won two bronze medals for 400m and 200m hurdles at the 1904 games [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Athletes - Famous Olympic Athletes, Medalists, Sports Heroes. (Retrieved 2011, June 13) George Poage. Retrieved from http://www.olympic.org/content/olympic-athletes/generic-athlete-page/?athleteid=57507
  • William Robert Poage (1899-1987), Texas politician
  • William Robert Poage (1899-1987), American Democrat politician, Member of Texas State House of Representatives, 1925-29; Member of Texas State Senate, 1931-37; U.S. Representative from Texas 11th District, 1937-78 [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, October 29) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  • W. S. Poage, American Republican politician, Alternate Delegate to Republican National Convention from Virginia, 1916 [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, October 29) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  • Richard C. Poage, American Republican politician, Delegate to Republican National Convention from Virginia, 1952, 1960 [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, October 29) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  • James S. Poage, American Republican politician, Presidential Elector for Illinois, 1864; Delegate to Illinois State Constitutional Convention 32nd District, 1869-70 [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, October 29) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  • James H. Poage, American Democrat politician, Candidate for U.S. Representative from Illinois 9th District, 1918 [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, October 29) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html
  • Donald E. Poage, American politician, Mayor of Coos Bay, Oregon, 1979-81 [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
    The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, October 29) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html

The Poage Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Audacter et strenue
Motto Translation: Boldly and earnestly.


Poage Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  2. ^ Athletes - Famous Olympic Athletes, Medalists, Sports Heroes. (Retrieved 2011, June 13) George Poage. Retrieved from http://www.olympic.org/content/olympic-athletes/generic-athlete-page/?athleteid=57507
  3. ^ The Political Graveyard: Alphabetical Name Index. (Retrieved 2015, October 29) . Retrieved from http://politicalgraveyard.com/alpha/index.html


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