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Mccrimon Surname History



Mccrimon is an ancient Dalriadan-Scottish nickname for a person noted as a guardian. The name, which is Mac Cruimein in Gaelic, is derived from the Old Norse Hromund, which means famed protector. "The late Dr. Alexander Carmichael, who gives the Gaelic form of the name as Maccriomthain, says that a woman of the name in St. Kilda recited some of the island songs to him. " [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)

Interestingly, Crimond is a parish, in the district of Deer, county of Aberdeen. "This place once contained a castle belonging to the celebrated Cumyn, Earl of Buchan, which stood on a small hill called Castlehill, and was suffered to fall into ruins after his fatal defeat at the battle of Inverury by Robert Bruce. " [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.



Early Origins of the Mccrimon family


The surname Mccrimon was first found in on the Isle of Skye, where they were hereditary Pipers to the MacLeods of Dunvegan and founded the famous College of Piping, the most celebrated of its kind in the world.

"A family of the name were hereditary pipers to Macleod of Macleod, the last of whom, Lieut. MacCrimmon, had a farm in Glenelg in the first quarter of the nineteenth century. The name is found on one of the rune-inscribed crosses at Kirk Michael, Isle of Man, as Rumun. " [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)

Interestingly, Crimond is a parish, in the district of Deer, county of Aberdeen. "This place once contained a castle belonging to the celebrated Cumyn, Earl of Buchan, which stood on a small hill called Castlehill, and was suffered to fall into ruins after his fatal defeat at the battle of Inverury by Robert Bruce. " [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.


Early History of the Mccrimon family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Mccrimon research.
Another 97 words (7 lines of text) covering the years 153 and 1533 are included under the topic Early Mccrimon History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Mccrimon Spelling Variations


Translation in medieval times was an undeveloped science and was often carried out without due care. For this reason, many early Scottish names appeared radically altered when written in English. The spelling variations of Mccrimon include MacCrimmon, MacRimmon, MacCrummen, MacCrummin, Crimmon, Crimmons, Crimmin and many more.

Early Notables of the Mccrimon family (pre 1700)


More information is included under the topic Early Mccrimon Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Mccrimon family to the New World and Oceana


Ancestors of many of the Dalriadan families who crossed the Atlantic still live along the east coast of the United States and Canada. Some Scottish settlers arrived in Canada during the American War of Independence as United Empire Loyalists, while others stayed south to fight for a new nation. The descendants of Scottish settlers in both countries began to rediscover their heritage in the 19th and 20th centuries through Clan societies and highland games. An inquiry into the early roots of North American families has revealed a number of immigrants bearing the name Mccrimon or a variant listed above: Donald MacCrimmon, who arrived in Philadelphia in 1847; W. Crimmond arrived in New York in 1822; John Crimmin arrived in Philadelphia in 1861.

See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)
  2. ^ Lewis, Samuel, A Topographical Dictionary of Scotland. Institute of Historical Research, 1848, Print.


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