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MacNutt History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms




Early Origins of the MacNutt family


The surname MacNutt was first found in Dumfriesshire (Gaelic: Siorrachd Dhùn Phris), a Southern area, bordering on England that today forms part of the Dumfries and Galloway Council Area. The name is "a variant of Macnaught (of Kilquhanite, Galloway)" [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)

Early History of the MacNutt family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our MacNutt research.
Another 154 words (11 lines of text) covering the years 1296, 1357, 1448, 1473, 1519, 1400, 1606, 1634, 1612, 1617, 1634, 1646 and 1718 are included under the topic Early MacNutt History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

MacNutt Spelling Variations


Spelling variations of this family name include: MacNaught, MacNeight, MacNutt, MacNitt, MacNaght and many more.

Early Notables of the MacNutt family (pre 1700)


Notable amongst the family at this time was John McKnawcht, Burgess of Edinburgh in 1612. He may be the same person as John M'Nacht, merchant burgess in the parish of Kirkpatrick- Durham in...
Another 31 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early MacNutt Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the MacNutt family to Ireland


Some of the MacNutt family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 124 words (9 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the MacNutt family to the New World and Oceana


Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

MacNutt Settlers in United States in the 18th Century

  • Alexander MacNutt, who landed in Massachusetts in 1720 [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  • Alexander Macnutt, who arrived in Massachusetts in 1720 [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)

Contemporary Notables of the name MacNutt (post 1700)


  • Francis Scott MacNutt (b. 1925), American former Roman Catholic priest
  • Walter Louis MacNutt (1910-1996), Canadian organist, choir director, and composer
  • Derrick Somerset Macnutt (1902-1971), British crossword creator who provided crosswords for The Observer newspaper under the pseudonym Ximenes
  • Thomas Russell "Russ" MacNutt (1895-1973), Canadian merchant and politician who represented Nipawin from 1952 to 1956 in the Legislative Assembly of Saskatchewan
  • Frederick Brodie MacNutt (1873-1949), English Anglican priest and author, Provost of Leicester (1927- 1934)
  • George Taylor MacNutt (1865-1937), Canadian contractor, lumber merchant and politician, Member of Parliament for Colchester (1925-1930)
  • Thomas MacNutt (1850-1927), Canadian politician, 1st Speaker of the Legislative Assembly of Saskatchewan (1906-1908), MLA for Saltcoats (1905-1908) and (1908-1921)
  • Peter MacNutt (b. 1834), Canadian merchant and politician, Member of the Legislative Council of Prince Edward Island from 1882 to 1886 and from 1890 to 1893

The MacNutt Motto


The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Omnia fortunae committo
Motto Translation: I commit all things to fortune.


MacNutt Family Crest Products



See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Black, George F., The Surnames of Scotland Their Origin, Meaning and History. New York: New York Public Library, 1946. Print. (ISBN 0-87104-172-3)
  2. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)


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