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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2016

Where did the English Ludlam family come from? When did the Ludlam family first arrive in the United States? Where did the various branches of the family go? What is the Ludlam family history?

The Anglo-Saxon name Ludlam comes from when the family resided on a hill beside a babbling river which was later referred to as Ludlow Ludlam is a topographic surname, which was given to a person who resided near a physical feature such as a hill, stream, church, or type of tree. Habitation names form the other broad category of surnames that were derived from place-names. They were derived from pre-existing names for towns, villages, parishes, or farmsteads. Other local names are derived from the names of houses, manors, estates, regions, and entire counties.

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Before English spelling was standardized a few hundred years ago, spelling variations of names were a common occurrence. Elements of Latin, French and other languages became incorporated into English through the Middle Ages, and name spellings changed even among the literate. The variations of the surname Ludlam include Ludlow, Ludley, Ludloe and others.

First found in Shropshire at Ludlow, a market town close to the Welsh border and in the Welsh Marches. The first listing of the place name dates back to 1138 where it was listed as Ludelaue and literally meant "hill or tumulus by a rapid," derived from the Old English words hlude + hlaw. [1] Ludlow was called by the Britons Dinam, or "the palace of princes," and by the Saxons Leadlowe, and Ludlowe. One reference claims Robert de Montgomery, kinsman of the Conqueror, fortified the town with walls, and erected most of its stately castle in which he lived until his death in 1094. Yet another reference claims the castle was built by Walter de Lacy in the late 11th century as possession of Ludlow Castle descended through the Lacy family until 1115. Mother Ludlam's Cave or Mother Ludlum's Hole is a small cave in the sandstone cliff of the Wey Valley at Moor Park, near Farnham, Surrey. The earliest record of the place occurs when a monk named Symon found a spring rising in the cave in the 13th century. Mother Ludlam was claimed to be a white witch who lived in the cave. Her cauldron has been kept in Frensham Church nearby for centuries.


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This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Ludlam research. Another 137 words (10 lines of text) covering the years 1590, 1664, 1634, 1617, 1692, 1551, 1588, 1680 and 1728 are included under the topic Early Ludlam History in all our PDF Extended History products.

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Another 173 words (12 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Ludlam Notables in all our PDF Extended History products.

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Some of the Ludlam family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. Another 55 words (4 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products.

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A great wave of immigration to the New World was the result of the enormous political and religious disarray that struck England at that time. Families left for the New World in extremely large numbers. The long journey was the end of many immigrants and many more arrived sick and starving. Still, those who made it were rewarded with an opportunity far greater than they had known at home in England. These emigrant families went on to make significant contributions to these emerging colonies in which they settled. Some of the first North American settlers carried this name or one of its variants:

Ludlam Settlers in United States in the 18th Century


  • Richard Ludlam, who arrived in South Carolina in 1723

Ludlam Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century


  • Alfred Ludlam landed in Wellington, New Zealand in 1840
  • Alfred Ludlam arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "London" in 1840
  • George Ludlam, aged 25, arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Steinwarder" in 1864
  • Ellen Ludlam, aged 24, arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Steinwarder" in 1864

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  • James Ludlam, American businessman who built the Ludlam Building, a Greek Revival styled building in Oyster Bay, New York
  • Charles Braun Ludlam (1943-1987), American actor, director, and playwright, posthumously inducted into the American Theater Hall of Fame in 2009
  • Robert J. Ludlam, American Democrat politician, Candidate for New York State Assembly from Nassau County 2nd District, 1922
  • Richard S. Ludlam, American politician, Member of New Jersey State House of Assembly from Cape May County, 1847
  • Providence Ludlam, American Republican politician, Delegate to Republican National Convention from New Jersey, 1860; Member of New Jersey State Senate from Cumberland County, 1863-68
  • Patience R. Ludlam, American Democrat politician, Alternate Delegate to Democratic National Convention from New Jersey, 1940
  • Lillian Ludlam, American Republican politician, Alternate Delegate to Republican National Convention from Connecticut, 1972
  • Jesse D. Ludlam, American politician, Member of New Jersey State House of Assembly from Cape May County, 1880, 1883-85
  • Furman L. Ludlam, American politician, Member of New Jersey State House of Assembly from Cape May County, 1895-96
  • William Ludlam (1717-1788), English clergyman and mathematician

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  1. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)

Other References

  1. Hanks, Patricia and Flavia Hodges. A Dictionary of Surnames. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988. Print. (ISBN 0-19-211592-8).
  2. Egle, William Henry. Pennsylvania Genealogies Scotch-Irish and German. Harrisburg: L.S. Hart, 1886. Print.
  3. Bede, The Venerable. Historia Ecclesiatica Gentis Anglorum (The Ecclesiastical History Of the English People). Available through Internet Medieval Sourcebook the Fordham University Centre for Medieval Studies. Print.
  4. Colletta, John P. They Came In Ships. Salt Lake City: Ancestry, 1993. Print.
  5. Ingram, Rev. James. Translator Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 1823. Print.
  6. Burke, Sir Bernard. General Armory Of England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales. Ramsbury: Heraldry Today. Print.
  7. Browning, Charles H. Americans of Royal Descent. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
  8. MacAulay, Thomas Babington. History of England from the Accession of James the Second 4 volumes. New York: Harper and Brothers, 1879. Print.
  9. Hinde, Thomas Ed. The Domesday Book England's Heritage Then and Now. Surrey: Colour Library Books, 1995. Print. (ISBN 1-85833-440-3).
  10. Virkus, Frederick A. Ed. Immigrant Ancestors A List of 2,500 Immigrants to America Before 1750. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1964. Print.
  11. ...


This page was last modified on 11 November 2015 at 09:32.

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