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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2018


Galbreth was first used as a surname among the descendants of the ancient Scottish people known as the Picts. It was a name for a person who came from Briton. The surname Galbreth comes from the Gaelic words gall, which means stranger, and Bhreathnach, which means Briton. This surname was given to those who were described as the strangers from Briton. Galbreth is therefore a nickname surname, which belongs to the category of hereditary surnames. Nicknames form a broad and miscellaneous class of surnames, and can refer directly or indirectly to one's personality, physical attributes, mannerisms, or even their habits of dress. Members of the Galbreth family settled in Angus, prior to the Norman invasion of England, in 1066.

Galbreth Early Origins



The surname Galbreth was first found in Angus (Gaelic: Aonghas), part of the Tayside region of northeastern Scotland, and present day Council Area of Angus, formerly known as Forfar or Forfarshire where the first Galbraith chief can be traced back to the 12th century. As this chief married a daughter of the Earl of Lennox the house must have been of a noble status. Sir William Galbraith, who was the fourth Chief of the Clan, became highly involved with Scottish national affairs. He was a co-regent of Scotland in 1255, serving a guardian of the young King Alexander III.

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Galbreth Spelling Variations


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Galbreth Spelling Variations



Repeated and inaccurate translation of Scottish names from Gaelic to English and back resulted in a wide variety of spelling variations with single names. Galbreth has appeared Galbraith, Galbreath, Galbreith, Galbreth, Galbrith, Galberth and many more.

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Galbreth Early History


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Galbreth Early History



This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Galbreth research. Another 236 words (17 lines of text) covering the year 1594 is included under the topic Early Galbreth History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Galbreth Early Notables (pre 1700)


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Galbreth Early Notables (pre 1700)



More information is included under the topic Early Galbreth Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Galbreth In Ireland


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Galbreth In Ireland



Some of the Galbreth family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. Another 261 words (19 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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The Great Migration


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The Great Migration



Many Scottish families suffered enormous hardships and were compelled to leave their country of birth. They traveled to Ireland and Australia, but mostly to the colonies of North America, where many found the freedom and opportunity they sought. It was not without a fight, though, as many were forced to stand up and defend their freedom in the American War of Independence. The ancestors of these Scots abroad have rediscovered their heritage in the last century through the Clan societies and other organizations that have sprung up across North America. Immigration and passenger ship lists show some important early immigrants bearing the name Galbreth: James Galberth who settled in Charles Town in 1767; Angus and his wife Katrine Galbreath settled in Wilmington in 1774; Andrew, Daniel, George, James, John, Robert, Samuel, Thomas and William Galbraith all arrived in Philadelphia between 1840 and 1865..

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Motto


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Motto



The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Ab Obice Suavior
Motto Translation: Stronger when opposed.


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Galbreth Family Crest Products


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Galbreth Family Crest Products




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See Also


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See Also




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Citations


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Citations



    Other References

    1. Innes, Thomas and Learney. Scots Heraldry A Practical Handbook on the Historical Principles and Mordern Application of the Art and Science. London: Oliver and Boyd, 1934. Print.
    2. Prebble, John. The Highland Clearances. London: Secker & Warburg, 1963. Print.
    3. Colletta, John P. They Came In Ships. Salt Lake City: Ancestry, 1993. Print.
    4. Le Patourel, John. The Norman Empire. New York: Oxford University Press, 1976. Print. (ISBN 0-19-822525-3).
    5. Dorward, David. Scottish Surnames. Glasgow: Harper Collins, 1995. Print.
    6. Burke, Sir Bernard. Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Landed Gentry Including American Families with British Ancestry 2 Volumes. London: Burke Publishing, 1939. Print.
    7. Weis, Frederick Lewis, Walter Lee Sheppard and David Faris. Ancestral Roots of Sixty Colonists Who Came to New England Between 1623 and 1650 7th Edition. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0806313676).
    8. Hanks, Patricia and Flavia Hodges. A Dictionary of Surnames. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988. Print. (ISBN 0-19-211592-8).
    9. Bell, Robert. The Book of Ulster Surnames. Belfast: Blackstaff, 1988. Print. (ISBN 10-0856404160).
    10. Bolton, Charles Knowles. Scotch Irish Pioneers In Ulster and America. Montana: Kessinger Publishing. Print.
    11. ...

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