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Bungay Surname History



Bungay is an ancient Norman name that arrived in England after the Norman Conquest of 1066. The Bungay family lived in Suffolk at Bungay, a market town that dates back to the Domesday Book where it was listed as Bunghea, probably derived from the Old English personal name + inga + eg and meant "island of the family or followers of a man called Buna." [1]CITATION[CLOSE]
Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
Another reference claims the placename was derived from the term "le-bon-eye," signifying "the good island," as it was nearly surrounded by the river Waveney, which was once a broad stream. Soon after the Norman Conquest, a castle was built, which, from its situation and the strength of its fortifications, was deemed impregnable by its possessor, Hugh Bigot, Earl of Norfolk, in the reign of Stephen; but that monarch, in the 6th of his reign, in the year 1140, came with his army and took it. Over the years Bungay Castle has fallen into ruins, but in 1934 the amateur archaeologist Leonard Cane convinced people that a restoration was needed. Today it is owned by the Bungay Castle Trust.


Early Origins of the Bungay family


The surname Bungay was first found in Suffolk where they held a family seat as Lords of the Manor of Bungay at the time of the Norman Conquest of England by Duke William of Normandy in 1066 A.D. Conjecturally they are descended from William de Noyers who held the lands of Bungay from the King. At the time of the taking of the Domesday Book survey in 1086 the holdings consisted of 4 Churches, 2.5 mills, 60 goats and 100 sheep. Bungay Castle was built by the Norman Earl Hugh Bigod in the 12th century.

Early History of the Bungay family


This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Bungay research.
Another 40 words (3 lines of text) covering the years 158 and 1588 are included under the topic Early Bungay History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Bungay Spelling Variations


Norman surnames are characterized by a multitude of spelling variations. The frequent changes in surnames are largely due to the fact that the Old and Middle English languages lacked definite spelling rules. The introduction of Norman French to England, as well as the official court languages of Latin and French, also had pronounced influences on the spelling of surnames. Since medieval scribes and church officials recorded names as they sounded, rather than adhering to any specific spelling rules, it was common to find the same individual referred to with different spellings. The name has been spelled Bungey, Bungay, Bunker, Bunkar, Bunkey, Bunkay, Bungy and many more.

Early Notables of the Bungay family (pre 1700)


More information is included under the topic Early Bungay Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Bungay family to the New World and Oceana


Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Bungay Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century

  • William Bungay was at Fair Island, Newfoundland in 1831 [2]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Seary E.R., Family Names of the Island of Newfoundland, Montreal: McGill's-Queen's Universtity Press 1998 ISBN 0-7735-1782-0
  • Jonathon Bungay was a fisherman in Jersey Harbour in 1853
  • Henry Thomas Bungay was in Bonavista in 1871

Bungay Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century

  • Samuel Bungay, aged 28, who arrived in South Australia in 1849 aboard the ship "Emily" [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
    State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) The EMILY 1849. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1849Emily.htm
  • Samuel Bungay, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Emily" in 1849 [3]CITATION[CLOSE]
    State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) The EMILY 1849. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1849Emily.htm

Bungay Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century

  • Newton Bungay, aged 38, a labourer, who arrived in Nelson, New Zealand aboard the ship "Chile" in 1874
  • Susan Bungay, aged 35, who arrived in Nelson, New Zealand aboard the ship "Chile" in 1874
  • Caroline Bungay, aged 9, who arrived in Nelson, New Zealand aboard the ship "Chile" in 1874
  • Elizabeth Bungay, aged 7, who arrived in Nelson, New Zealand aboard the ship "Chile" in 1874
  • Emily Bungay, aged 4, who arrived in Nelson, New Zealand aboard the ship "Chile" in 1874
  • ... (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name Bungay (post 1700)


  • Frank Bungay (b. 1905), English professional footballer from Sheffield
  • Stephen Bungay (b. 1954), British historian and author, specialist in the Battle of Britain

Historic Events for the Bungay family



Halifax Explosion

  • Mr. Edward A.  Bungay (1863-1917), Canadian resident from Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada who died in the explosion [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Halifax Explosion Book of Remembrance | Maritime Museum of the Atlantic. (Retrieved 2014, June 23) . Retrieved from https://maritimemuseum.novascotia.ca/what-see-do/halifax-explosion/halifax-explosion-book-remembrance
  • Mr. Howard Wilson  Bungay (1899-1917), Canadian resident from Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada who died in the explosion [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Halifax Explosion Book of Remembrance | Maritime Museum of the Atlantic. (Retrieved 2014, June 23) . Retrieved from https://maritimemuseum.novascotia.ca/what-see-do/halifax-explosion/halifax-explosion-book-remembrance
  • Mr. Edward Jr A  Bungay (1901-1917), Canadian resident from Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada who survived the explosion but later died due to injuries [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Halifax Explosion Book of Remembrance | Maritime Museum of the Atlantic. (Retrieved 2014, June 23) . Retrieved from https://maritimemuseum.novascotia.ca/what-see-do/halifax-explosion/halifax-explosion-book-remembrance
  • Miss Gladys  Bungay (1907-1917), Canadian resident from Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada who died in the explosion [4]CITATION[CLOSE]
    Halifax Explosion Book of Remembrance | Maritime Museum of the Atlantic. (Retrieved 2014, June 23) . Retrieved from https://maritimemuseum.novascotia.ca/what-see-do/halifax-explosion/halifax-explosion-book-remembrance

See Also



Citations


  1. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)
  2. ^ Seary E.R., Family Names of the Island of Newfoundland, Montreal: McGill's-Queen's Universtity Press 1998 ISBN 0-7735-1782-0
  3. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) The EMILY 1849. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1849Emily.htm
  4. ^ Halifax Explosion Book of Remembrance | Maritime Museum of the Atlantic. (Retrieved 2014, June 23) . Retrieved from https://maritimemuseum.novascotia.ca/what-see-do/halifax-explosion/halifax-explosion-book-remembrance


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