Bullman History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The origins of the Bullman surname lie with the Anglo-Saxon tribes of Britain. The name Bullman began when someone in that family worked as a keeper of the bull. This surname was originally derived from the Old English buleman where its origins can be traced to Northumberland.

Early Origins of the Bullman family

The surname Bullman was first found in Norfolk, where they held a family seat from ancient times.

Early History of the Bullman family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Bullman research. Another 133 words (10 lines of text) covering the years 1209, 1273, 1390, 1392, 1530, 1569, 1577, 1601, 1662, and 1686 are included under the topic Early Bullman History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Bullman Spelling Variations

One relatively recent invention that did much to standardize English spelling was the printing press. However, before its invention even the most literate people recorded their names according to sound rather than spelling. The spelling variations under which the name Bullman has appeared include Bullman, Buleman, Boleman, Bulleman, Bulman and many more.

Early Notables of the Bullman family (pre 1700)

Another 30 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Bullman Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.


United States Bullman migration to the United States +

At this time, the shores of the New World beckoned many English families that felt that the social climate in England was oppressive and lacked opportunity for change. Thousands left England at great expense in ships that were overcrowded and full of disease. A great portion of these settlers never survived the journey and even a greater number arrived sick, starving, and without a penny. The survivors, however, were often greeted with greater opportunity than they could have experienced back home. These English settlers made significant contributions to those colonies that would eventually become the United States and Canada. An examination of early immigration records and passenger ship lists revealed that people bearing the name Bullman arrived in North America very early:

Bullman Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • John Bullman who arrived in Maryland in 1722
  • Christian Bullman, aged 20, who arrived in Pennsylvania in 1738 [1]
  • John Bullman, who arrived in Pennsylvania in 1761 [1]
Bullman Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Robert Bullman who arrived in Boston in 1850
  • C Bullman, who landed in San Francisco, California in 1851 [1]

Canada Bullman migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Bullman Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century
  • Miss. Catherine Bullman, aged 8 who was emigrating through Grosse Isle Quarantine Station, Quebec aboard the ship "Avon" departing 19th May 1847 from Cork, Ireland; the ship arrived on 26th July 1847 but she died on board [2]
  • Mr. John Bullman, aged 30 who was emigrating through Grosse Isle Quarantine Station, Quebec aboard the ship "Avon" departing 19th May 1847 from Cork, Ireland; the ship arrived on 26th July 1847 but he died on board [2]
  • Miss. Margaret Bullman who was emigrating through Grosse Isle Quarantine Station, Quebec aboard the ship "Avon" departing 19th May 1847 from Cork, Ireland; the ship arrived on 26th July 1847 but she died on board [2]

Australia Bullman migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Bullman Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Ellen Bullman, aged 17, who arrived in South Australia in 1849 aboard the ship "Elgin" [3]
  • Ellen Bullman, aged 17, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Elgin" in 1849 [3]

West Indies Bullman migration to West Indies +

The British first settled the British West Indies around 1604. They made many attempts but failed in some to establish settlements on the Islands including Saint Lucia and Grenada. By 1627 they had managed to establish settlements on St. Kitts (St. Christopher) and Barbados, but by 1641 the Spanish had moved in and destroyed some of these including those at Providence Island. The British continued to expand the settlements including setting the First Federation in the British West Indies by 1674; some of the islands include Barbados, Bermuda, Cayman Island, Turks and Caicos, Jamaica and Belize then known as British Honduras. By the 1960's many of the islands became independent after the West Indies Federation which existed from 1958 to 1962 failed due to internal political conflicts. After this a number of Eastern Caribbean islands formed a free association. [4]
Bullman Settlers in West Indies in the 17th Century
  • Jo Bullman, aged 40, who landed in Barbados in 1635 [1]
  • Mr. John Bullman, (b. 1595), aged 40, British settler travelling from London, England aboard the ship "Alexander" arriving in Barbados in 1635 [5]

Contemporary Notables of the name Bullman (post 1700) +

  • John Bullman (1870-1922), American jockey and a two-time winner of the Belmont Stakes horse race


The Bullman Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Pro patria
Motto Translation: For my country.


  1. ^ Filby, P. William, Meyer, Mary K., Passenger and immigration lists index : a guide to published arrival records of about 500,000 passengers who came to the United States and Canada in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries. 1982-1985 Cumulated Supplements in Four Volumes Detroit, Mich. : Gale Research Co., 1985, Print (ISBN 0-8103-1795-8)
  2. ^ Charbonneau, André, and Doris Drolet-Dubé. A Register of Deceased Persons at Sea and on Grosse Île in 1847. The Minister of Canadian Heritage, 1997. ISBN: 0-660-198/1-1997E (p. 67)
  3. ^ State Records of South Australia. (Retrieved 2010, November 5) ELGIN 1849. Retrieved from http://www.slsa.sa.gov.au/BSA/1849Elgin.htm
  4. ^ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_West_Indies
  5. ^ Pilgrim Ship Lists Early 1600's retrieved 28th September 2021. (Retrieved from https://www.packrat-pro.com/ships/shiplist.htm)


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