Home   |   Customer Service   |   Site Map   |   Name Search   |   How To Buy

Shopping Cart
0 Items
BBB - A+ Rating - the best there is
An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright © 2000 - 2014

Where did the English Rude family come from? What is the English Rude family crest and coat of arms? When did the Rude family first arrive in the United States? Where did the various branches of the family go? What is the Rude family history?

The name Rude is part of the ancient legacy of the Anglo-Saxon tribes of Britain. It is a product of when the family lived near a ridge. Also, some examples of the name are of nickname derivation. This makes Rude a classic example of an English polygenetic surname, which is a surname that was developed in a number of different locations and adopted by various families independently. The local variant of the surname is derived from the Old English word hrycg, which means ridge. In Old English, thish word became rugge, regge, and rigge in various dialects of the language. The surname Rude is derived from the rugge variant of the word. The nickname variant is derived from the Anglo French word rugge (rouge in Modern French) which means red, and would have been the nickname of someone with brilliant red hair.

 More

The first dictionaries that appeared in the last few hundred years did much to standardize the English language. Before that time, spelling variations in names were a common occurrence. The language was changing, incorporating pieces of other languages, and the spelling of names changed with it. Rude has been spelled many different ways, including Rudge, Ruidge, Roidge, Rutdge, Rutge, Rudych, Rutch, Rutche, Ruitge and many more.

First found in Shropshire at Rudge, a township, in the parish of Pattingham. The place name was listed in the Domesday Book of 1086 as Rigge [1] and was derived from the Old English word "hrycg" which means "place at the ridge." [2] There are few other places named Rudge in Britain, specifically in the counties Devon, Wiltshire and Somerset and all are very small locals and have remained small through the centuries.


 More

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Rude research. Another 193 words(14 lines of text) covering the years 1320 and 1637 are included under the topic Early Rude History in all our PDF Extended History products.

 More

More information is included under the topic Early Rude Notables in all our PDF Extended History products.

 More

Thousands of English families in this era began to emigrate the New World in search of land and freedom from religious and political persecution. Although the passage was expensive and the ships were dark, crowded, and unsafe, those who made the voyage safely were rewarded with opportunities unavailable to them in their homeland. Research into passenger and immigration lists has revealed some of the very first Rudes to arrive in North America:

Rude Settlers in the United States in the 17th Century


  • Nicholas Rude, who arrived in Maryland or Virginia in 1665

Rude Settlers in the United States in the 19th Century


  • Barbara Rude, aged 13, landed in Pennsylvania in 1803
  • Doras Rude, who arrived in Pennsylvania in 1803
  • Elisabeth Rude, who landed in Pennsylvania in 1803
  • Friederick Rude, who arrived in Pennsylvania in 1803
  • Fritz Rude, who landed in Pennsylvania in 1803


 More

  • François Rude (1784-1855), French sculptor


 More

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will; many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: In cruce fides
Motto Translation: Faith in the cross.

 More

 More

  1. ^ Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin, Eds., Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8)
  2. ^ Mills, A.D., Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4)

Other References

  1. Fairbairn. Fairbain's book of Crests of the Families of Great Britain and Ireland, 4th Edition 2 volumes in one. Baltimore: Heraldic Book Company, 1968. Print.
  2. Bardsley, C.W. A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames: With Special American Instances. Wiltshire: Heraldry Today, 1901. Print. (ISBN 0-900455-44-6).
  3. Papworth, J.W and A.W Morant. Ordinary of British Armorials. London: T.Richards, 1874. Print.
  4. Lennard, Reginald. Rural England 1086-1135 A Study of Social and Agrarian Conditions. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1959. Print.
  5. Williams, Dr Ann. And G.H. Martin . Domesday Book A Complete Translation. London: Penguin, 1992. Print. (ISBN 0-141-00523-8).
  6. Sanders, Joanne McRee Edition. English Settlers in Barbados 1637-1800. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing. Print.
  7. Mills, A.D. Dictionary of English Place-Names. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991. Print. (ISBN 0-19-869156-4).
  8. Bolton, Charles Knowles. Bolton's American Armory. Baltimore: Heraldic Book Company, 1964. Print.
  9. Virkus, Frederick A. Ed. Immigrant Ancestors A List of 2,500 Immigrants to America Before 1750. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1964. Print.
  10. Colletta, John P. They Came In Ships. Salt Lake City: Ancestry, 1993. Print.
  11. ...

The Rude Family Crest was acquired from the Houseofnames.com archives. The Rude Family Crest was drawn according to heraldic standards based on published blazons. We generally include the oldest published family crest once associated with each surname.

This page was last modified on 3 July 2014 at 15:42.

©2000-2014 Swyrich Corporation. See Terms of Use for details.
houseofnames.com is an internet property owned by Swyrich Corporation.


Sign Up


BBB - A+ Rating - the best there is