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An excerpt from www.HouseOfNames.com archives copyright 2000 - 2014

Origins Available: Irish, Scottish

Where did the Scottish Corrie family come from? When did the Corrie family first arrive in the United States? Where did the various branches of the family go? What is the Corrie family history?

In ancient Scotland, Corrie was a Strathclyde-Briton name for someone who lived in the parish of Hutton Corrie in the county of Dumfriesshire.

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Prior to the first dictionaries, scribes spelled words according to sound. This, and the fact that Scottish names were repeatedly translated from Gaelic to English and back, contributed to the enormous number of spelling variations in Scottish names. Corrie has been spelled Corrie, Corry, Corey, Correy, Corrye, Corie, Cory, Cawrie, Cawrey and many more.

First found in Dumfriesshire (Gaelic: Siorrachd Dhn Phris), a Southern area, bordering on England that today forms part of the Dumfries and Galloway Council Area, where they held a family seat from very ancient times, some say well before the Norman Conquest and the arrival of Duke William at Hastings in 1066 A.D.


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This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Corrie research. Another 351 words(25 lines of text) covering the years 1194, 1296, 1379, 1398, 1449, 1526, 1547 and 1797 are included under the topic Early Corrie History in all our PDF Extended History products.

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More information is included under the topic Early Corrie Notables in all our PDF Extended History products.

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Some of the Corrie family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. Another 157 words(11 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products.

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In such difficult times, the difficulties of raising the money to cross the Atlantic to North America did not seem so large compared to the problems of keeping a family together in Scotland. It was a journey well worth the cost, since it was rewarded with land and freedom the Scots could not find at home. The American War of Independence solidified that freedom, and many of those settlers went on to play important parts in the forging of a great nation. Among them:

  • Alexander, Jane, Margaret, Nicholas, Robert and William Corrie arrived in Charles Town [Charleston], South Carolina in the 18th century

Corrie Settlers in the United States in the 19th Century


  • James Corrie, aged 44, landed in Maryland in 1812
  • John Corrie, aged 51, arrived in North Carolina in 1812
  • William Corrie, who arrived in New York in 1824
  • Robert Corrie, who landed in Allegany (Allegheny) County, Pennsylvania in 1828
  • Robert Corrie, who applied for Naturalization in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania in 1828

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  • Rachel Aliene Corrie (1979-2003), American member of the International Solidarity Movement killed in the Gaza Strip by an Israel Defence Forces bulldozer
  • Heather Corrie (b. 1971), British-born American slalom canoer
  • Joe Corrie (1894-1968), Scottish miner, poet and playwright
  • John Alexander Corrie (b. 1935), British Conservative Party politician
  • Anthony Corrie (b. 1984), Australian rules footballer
  • Will Corrie, British actor of the silent era
  • Edward Lyall Corrie (1848-1931), English rower
  • Emily Corrie (b. 1978), British Royal Navy sailor and former actress
  • Leslie Gordon Corrie (1859-1918), Australian architect and the mayor of Brisbane
  • The Rt Rev Daniel Corrie (1778-1837), English churchman, the inaugural Bishop of Madras

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  1. Crozier, William Armstrong Edition. Crozier's General Armory A Registry of American Families Entitled to Coat Armor. New York: Fox, Duffield, 1904. Print.
  2. Moody David. Scottish Family History. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1994. Print. (ISBN 0806312688).
  3. Innes, Thomas and Learney. Scots Heraldry A Practical Handbook on the Historical Principles and Mordern Application of the Art and Science. London: Oliver and Boyd, 1934. Print.
  4. Samuelsen, W. David. New York City Passenger List Manifests Index 1820 - 1824. North Salt Lake, Utah: Accelerated Indexing Systems International, 1986. Print.
  5. The Norman People and Their Existing Descendants in the British Dominions and the United States Of America. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing, 1975. Print. (ISBN 0-8063-0636-X).
  6. Fairbairn,. Fairbain's book of Crests of the Families of Great Britain and Ireland, 4th Edition 2 volumes in one. Baltimore: Heraldic Book Company, 1968. Print.
  7. Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at Galveston Texas 1896-1951. National Archives Washington DC. Print.
  8. Moncrieffe, Sir Ian of That Ilk and David Hicks. The Highland Clans The Dynastic Origins, Cheifs and Background of the Clans. New York: C.N. Potter, 1968. Print.
  9. Scarlett, James D. Tartan The Highland Textile. London: Shepheard-Walwyn, 1990. Print. (ISBN 0-85683-120-4).
  10. Bolton, Charles Knowles. Scotch Irish Pioneers In Ulster and America. Montana: Kessinger Publishing. Print.
  11. ...


This page was last modified on 28 March 2014 at 13:52.

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